ASN's Mission

ASN leads the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients.

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Nephrologists Transforming Dialysis Safety

Nephrologists Transforming Dialysis Safety (NTDS)

This page was last updated on April 14, 2020

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NTDS Project Mission Statement

To enhance the quality of life for people with kidney failure by engaging nephrologists as team leaders in transformational change that continuously improves the safety of life sustaining dialysis.


NEW ONLINE LEARNING MODULE. In partnership with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), NTDS is pleased to present this online resource, which presents core infection prevention and patient safety concepts in a case-based format. To view the Module, click here.

NTDS is pleased to present the Annual Report for Year 3 of the NTDS Project! To view the Report, click here.

Download the "Days Since Infection" Poster here.

Standardization of Blood Culture Collection for Patients Receiving In-Center Hemodialysis

In collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), Standardization of Blood Culture Collection for Patients Receiving In-Center Hemodialysis was developed by an NTDS workgroup in response to requests from healthcare professionals engaged in outpatient hemodialysis care. The document seeks to provide an accessible summary of information from published guidelines, reports and studies. Sample protocols for obtaining blood cultures and communication tools are provided. Collectively the information is intended to provide a reference for dialysis facilities as they develop facility-specific procedures, policies and protocols.

View the Standardization of Blood Culture Collection for Patients Receiving In-Center Hemodialysis resource here.



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CDC recommends annual influenza vaccination for everyone 6 months and older with any licensed, influenza vaccine that is appropriate for the recipient's age and health status, (IIV, RIV4, or LAIV4) with no preference expressed for any one vaccine over another.

The CDC website offers many influenza-related resources:

Resource Library: Highlight

Essential Components of an Infection Prevention Program for Outpatient Hemodialysis Centers
Essential Components of an Infection Prevention Program for Outpatient Hemodialysis Centers
Source: Seminars in Dialysis First published: 28 June 2013 https://doi.org/10.1111/sdi.12102 Authors: Sally Hess, Virginia Bren Abstract: Infections are a significant complication for dialysis patients. The CDC estimates that 37,000 central line‐related bloodstream infections occurred in hemodialysis patients in 2008 and dialysis‐associated outbreaks of hepatitis C continue to be reported. While established hospital‐based infection prevention programs have existed since the 1970s, few dialysis facilities have an established in‐center program, unless the dialysis facility is hospital‐associated. This review focuses on essential core components required for an effective infection prevention program, extrapolating from acute‐care programs and building on current dialysis guidelines and recommendations. An effective infection prevention program requires infrastructure, including leaders who place infection prevention as a top priority, active involvement from a multidisciplinary team, surveillance of outcomes and processes with feedback, staff and patient education, and consistent use of evidence‐based practices. The program must be integrated into the existing Quality Assessment and Performance Improvement program. Best practice recommendations for the prevention of infection, specific to dialysis, continue to evolve as the epidemiology of dialysis‐associated infections is further researched and new evidence is gathered. A review of case studies illustrates that with an effective program in place, infection prevention becomes part of the culture, reduces infection risk, and improves patient safety.Posted May 20, 2019

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