Abstract: TH-PO166

Health Related Quality of Life (HRQOL) in Primary Glomerular Disease: The Initial CureGN Experience

Session Information

Category: Glomerular

  • 1005 Clinical Glomerular Disorders

Authors

  • Canetta, Pietro A., Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
  • Mahoney, Shannon L., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Nachman, Patrick H., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Selewski, David T., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Srivastava, Tarak, Childrens's Mercy Hospital, Kansas City, Missouri, United States
  • Tuttle, Katherine R., University of Washington, Spokane, Washington, United States
  • Wang, Chia- Shi, Emory University, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Troost, Jonathan P., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Gipson, Debbie S., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Bartosh, Sharon M., University of Wisconsin Children's Hospital, Madison, Wisconsin, United States
  • Cai, Yi, Helen DeVos Children's Hospital, Grand Rapids, Michigan, United States
  • Fernandez, Hilda E., Columbia University, New York, New York, United States
  • Fornoni, Alessia, University of Miami , Miami, Florida, United States
  • Gbadegesin, Rasheed A., Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Herreshoff, Emily G., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Kogon, Amy, Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, United States
  • Mahan, John D., Nationwide Children's Hospital, Columbus, Ohio, United States

Group or Team Name

  • CureGN Consortium
Background

There is little published data on HRQOL in patients with primary glomerular diseases.

Methods

We studied HRQOL in subjects enrolled in CureGN, an international cohort of participants with minimal change disease, FSGS, membranous nephropathy, and IgA nephropathy or IgA vasculitis. HRQOL was assessed at enrollment using the Patient Reported Outcomes Measurement Information System (PROMIS). Domains measured in adults were: Global Assessment of Physical Health, Mental Health, Fatigue, Sleep, and Anxiety; domains in children were: Global Health, Mobility, Fatigue, and Anxiety. Minimally important differences have been defined as score change of 3 for the pediatric domains and have not been defined for adult domains. Immunosuppression (IS) in the past 60 days was classified as None, Glucocorticoids alone, or Other IS. Differences in HRQOL scores are reported as mean [95% confidence interval]. Multivariable analysis was conducted by linear regression with backwards selection.

Results

Data were available from 349 children and 918 adults. In children, multivariable analyses revealed PROMIS Global Health scores were worse with edema (-3.2 [-5.5 to -0.9]) and obesity (-4.5 [-6.9 to -2.1]) but were not significantly different across levels of proteinuria or eGFR. In adults, PROMIS Global Physical Health scores were worse with edema (-6.3 [-7.7 to -5.0]), log UPC (-0.6 [-0.9 to -0.2]), eGFR per -30 ml/min (-1.1 [-1.6 to -0.5]), female sex (-1.8 [-3.1 to -0.5]), and obesity (-3.2 [-4.8 to -1.7]). Race, ethnicity, diagnosis, disease duration, hematuria, and IS were not associated with HRQOL. In multivariable analysis, edema was the strongest predictor of HRQOL across both age groups and PROMIS domains (Figure).

Conclusion

Children and adults with glomerular diseases report a range of HRQOL. Edema was a consistent predictor of poor HRQOL across all measured domains of Global Health, Anxiety, Fatigue, Sleep, and Mobility.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support