Abstract: FR-PO517

The Effect of High Alcohol Consumption on Incidence of Proteinuria Was Different by Gender: A Retrospective Cohort Study

Session Information

Category: Chronic Kidney Disease (Non-Dialysis)

  • 304 CKD: Epidemiology, Outcomes - Non-Cardiovascular

Authors

  • Kimura, Yoshiki, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
  • Moriyama, Toshiki, Health and Counseling Center Osaka University, Toyonaka, Japan
  • Watanabe, Tsuyoshi, Steering Committee for the Research on the Positioning of Chronic Kidney Disease in Specific Health Check and Guidance in Japan, Fukushima, Japan
  • Yamamoto, Ryohei, Health and Counseling Center Osaka University, Toyonaka, Japan
  • Isaka, Yoshitaka, Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine, Suita, Japan
  • Iseki, Kunitoshi, Steering Committee for the Research on the Positioning of Chronic Kidney Disease in Specific Health Check and Guidance in Japan, Fukushima, Japan
  • Yamagata, Kunihiro, Steering Committee for the Research on the Positioning of Chronic Kidney Disease in Specific Health Check and Guidance in Japan, Fukushima, Japan
  • Tsuruya, Kazuhiko, Steering Committee for the Research on the Positioning of Chronic Kidney Disease in Specific Health Check and Guidance in Japan, Fukushima, Japan
  • Yoshida, Hideaki, Steering Committee for the Research on the Positioning of Chronic Kidney Disease in Specific Health Check and Guidance in Japan, Fukushima, Japan
  • Fujimoto, Shouichi, Steering Committee for the Research on the Positioning of Chronic Kidney Disease in Specific Health Check and Guidance in Japan, Fukushima, Japan
  • Asahi, Koichi, Steering Committee for the Research on the Positioning of Chronic Kidney Disease in Specific Health Check and Guidance in Japan, Fukushima, Japan
Background

Several studies reported that mild to moderate alcohol consumption reduced the risk of proteinuria, whereas a proteinuric effect of heavy alcohol consumption is controversial. The aim of this retrospective cohort study was to assess an association between high alcohol consumption and the incidence of proteinuria in males and females.

Methods

Participants who underwent annual health check examinations in Japan with dipstick urinary protein ≤± and/or eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73m2 at their first examinations between 2008 and 2011 were included in this analysis. Main exposure was alcohol consumption categories defined as rare, occasional and daily drinkers with ≤19, 20-39, 40-59 and ≥60 g/day. The outcome was time to first incidence of proteinuria (dipstick urinary protein ≥1+). An association between alcohol consumption and incidence of proteinuria was assessed using Cox proportional hazards models.

Results

Background of participants in 78,327 males and 78,369 females; age 65 [57-69] (median [25%-75%]) and 64 [59-69] years; eGFR 75 [69-86] and 76 [68-90] ml/min/1.73m2; respectively. Incidence of proteinuria was observed in 4,991 males and 3,040 females during 1.9 (1.0-2.1) years of the observational period. The association between alcohol consumption and incidence of proteinuria was U-shaped in males and J-shaped in females (Figure).

Conclusion

The effect of high alcohol consumption on incidence of proteinuria was different between males and females. The association was J-shaped in female and U-shape in males, respectively, suggesting that females were more vulnerable to alcohol than males.

Funding

  • Government Support - Non-U.S.