Abstract: SA-PO499

Gut Microbiota Disturbances and Post-Transplant Diarrhea in Kidney Allograft Recipients

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1702 Transplantation: Clinical and Translational

Authors

  • Lee, John Richard, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Suthanthiran, Manikkam, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Magruder, Matthew, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Zhang, Lisa T, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Muthukumar, Thangamani, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Dadhania, Darshana, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Westblade, Lars, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Satlin, Michael, Weill Cornell Medicine, New York, New York, United States
  • Ling, Lilan, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, United States
  • Pamer, Eric, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, New York, New York, United States
Background

Diarrhea is a common complication in kidney transplant recipients, but its etiology is unknown. In a prior gut microbiota profiling study, we reported lower abundance of commensal bacterial taxa (Ruminococcus, Dorea, Corpococcus, and Bacteroides) in kidney transplant recipients with post-transplant diarrhea.

Methods

Herein, we perform a validation study using an independent cohort of 71 kidney transplant recipients. We collected 199 serial fecal specimens from this population in the first 3 months of transplantation and profiled their microbiota using 16S rRNA deep sequencing of the V4-V5 hypervariable region. 24 subjects developed post-transplant diarrhea and 47 did not. We compared 28 diarrheal fecal specimens from the Diarrhea Group to 111 fecal specimens from the No Diarrhea Group.

Results

Microbial diversity was significantly lower in the diarrheal fecal specimens from the Diarrhea Group than in the fecal specimens from the No Diarrhea Group (P < 0.001, Wilcoxon rank sum) (Fig A) and non-metric dimensional scaling using Bray-Curtis dissimilarity separated the two groups (Fig B). Thirteen genera including the 4 reported in the prior study were significantly lower in the diarrheal fecal specimens from the Diarrhea Group than in the fecal specimens from the No Diarrhea Group (q value<0.15, Benjamini-Hochberg correction) (Fig C). PCR array for common diarrhea-associated pathogens (Biofire GI Film Array) was negative in 26 of 28 diarrhea fecal specimens.

Conclusion

We have identified decreased commensal bacterial taxa in the kidney transplant recipients with post-transplant diarrhea, which supports future studies using prebiotics and/or probiotics to prevent and/or treat this common complication.

Funding

  • Other NIH Support