Abstract: FR-PO425

Self-Reported Tobacco, Alcohol, and Illicit Drug Use and Progression of CKD: The CRIC Study

Session Information

Category: Chronic Kidney Disease (Non-Dialysis)

  • 301 CKD: Risk Factors for Incidence and Progression

Authors

  • Bundy, Joshua David, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Robinson, Nancy, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Steigerwalt, Susan P., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Wang, Xue, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • He, Jiang, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Bazzano, Lydia, Tulane University School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Xie, Dawei, University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine , Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Dolata, Jacqueline, MetroHealth Medical Center, Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Fink, Jeffrey C., University of Maryland, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Hsu, Chi-yuan, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Jamerson, Kenneth A., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Lash, James P., University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Makos, Gail K., St Clair Speciality Physicians, Detroit, Michigan, United States
Background

The associations of tobacco, alcohol, and illicit drug use with risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD) progression and all-cause mortality have not been well studied among patients with CKD.

Methods

The Chronic Renal Insufficiency Cohort (CRIC) Study is a prospective cohort study of 3939 adults with CKD recruited from seven US clinical sites. Self-reported questionnaires annually assessed current smoking, weekly drinking (consumed alcohol ≥1 days per week), any marijuana use, and any hard illicit drug use (use of cocaine, heroin, or methamphetamine). CKD progression was defined as halving of estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) or initiation of dialysis or kidney transplant. Deaths were confirmed by death certificate. Multiple time-dependent Cox regression was used to assess the associations of drug use with progression of CKD and all-cause mortality.

Results

Over an average 5.4-year follow-up, 1287 participants had CKD progression and 1001 died. Current smoking and hard illicit drug use were significantly associated with increased risk of CKD progression or all-cause mortality (Table).

Conclusion

Among patients with CKD, current smoking and hard illicit drug use may increase the risk of CKD progression and all-cause mortality.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support