Abstract: TH-PO426

Correlation between Vitamin D Deficiency and Hematuria: Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey

Session Information

Category: Nutrition, Inflammation, and Metabolism

  • 1401 Nutrition, Inflammation, Metabolism

Authors

  • Ryu, Hyunjin, Seoul National University Hospital, JongNo-Gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Han, Seung Seok, Seoul National University Hospital, JongNo-Gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Jung, Young Lee, Seoul National University Hospital, JongNo-Gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Yaerim, Seoul National University Hospital, JongNo-Gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Hwang, Cheolgu, Seoul National University Hospital, JongNo-Gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Choi, Jae shin, Seoul National University Hospital, JongNo-Gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Dong Ki, Seoul National University Hospital, JongNo-Gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Oh, Yun Kyu, Department of Internal Medicine, Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Joo, Kwon Wook, Seoul National University Hospital, JongNo-Gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Yon Su, Seoul National University Hospital, JongNo-Gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Vitamin D deficiency is an important health concern because it is related with several comorbidities and mortality. However, its relationship with the risk of hematuria remains undetermined in the general population.

Methods

Cross-sectional analysis was applied to the subjects (n=20,240, aged ≥18 years old) using Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (KNHANES) 2010–2014. Serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)] levels were measured in a central laboratory and hematuria was defined as ≥1+ on a dipstick test. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted to calculate the odds ratio (OR) of hematuria risk according to the 25(OH)D quartiles, after adjusting 10 covariates, such as comorbidities and laboratory findings.

Results

Of study subjects, 10,847 (53.6%) were female and 5,388 (26.6%) were identified as menopause. The mean age and estimated glomerular filtration rates were 49±16.3 year old and 88±17.4 mL/min/1.73m2, respectively. The number of subjects with hematuria was 3,144 (15.5%). The mean 25(OH)D level was 17.4±6.2 ng/ml [median, 16.6 ng/ml (interquartile range, 13.1–20.8 ng/ml)]. The 3rd and 4th quartiles had a higher risk of hematuria than the 1st quartile, as following adjusted ORs; 1.1 (1.02-1.29) and 1.3 (1.12-1.42) in the 3rd and 4th quartiles, respectively. However, this relationship was only significant in the female subjects, not in the male subjects [Figure]. Subsequent analyses were stratified according to the menopausal status. For the premenopausal females, there was no significant increase of hematuria risk according to the quartiles. However, for the postmenopausal females, the increased risk of hematuria was shown in all the higher quartiles, compared with the 1st quartile.

Conclusion

Vitamin D deficiency was correlated with hematuria in female subjects, particularly after menopause. Further interventional studies are warranted to address whether the correction of vitamin D deficiency lowers the hematuria risk.