Abstract: FR-PO554

Fetal but Not Maternal APOL1 Genotype Is Associated with Increased Risk for Preeclampsia among African-Americans

Session Information

Category: Hypertension

  • 1103 Vascular Biology and Dysfunction

Authors

  • Hjorten, Rebecca C., Children's Hospital at Montefiore/ Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronxville, New York, United States
  • Mozhui, Khyobeni, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, United States
  • Haque, Soulin, Albert Einstein College of Medicine , Bronx, New York, United States
  • Suzuki, Masako, Albert Einstein College of Medicine , Bronx, New York, United States
  • Reznik, Sandra E., Montefiore Medical Center and Albert Einstein College of Medicine/St. John''s University, Queens, New York, United States
  • Kaskel, Frederick J., Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Children's Hospital at Montefiore, Bronx, New York, United States
  • Kopp, Jeffrey B., NIDDK, NIH, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Winkler, Cheryl Ann, NCI, NIH, Frederick National Laboratory, Frederick, Maryland, United States
  • Davis, Robert L., University of Tennessee, Memphis, Tennessee, United States
  • Reidy, Kimberly J., Children's Hospital at Montefiore/ Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronxville, New York, United States
  • Simpson, Claire Louise, UNIVERSITY OF TENNESSEE HEALTH SCI CTR, Memphis, Tennessee, United States
  • Rosenberg, A Z, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, Maryland, United States
  • Rosenblum, Stacy, Montefiore Medical Center , Suffern, New York, United States
  • Kovesdy, Csaba P., University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, United States
  • Tylavsky, Frances A, University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Memphis, Tennessee, United States
  • Myrie, Joseph, Albert Einstein College of Medicine , Bronx, New York, United States
  • Ruiz, Bianca Lyzette, Albert Einstein College of Medicine , Bronx, New York, United States
Background

African Americans are at increased risk for preeclampsia. Genetic variants in apolipoprotein L1 (APOL1) account for a substantial fraction of increased risk of kidney disease among African Americans. APOL1 is expressed in human placenta, and transgenic mice expressing APOL1 develop preeclampsia. The role of APOL1 variants in human preeclampsia has not been studied.

Methods

Two studies were performed evaluating maternal and fetal APOL1 genotypes in African American women with preeclampsia. At Albert Einstein College of Medicine (AECOM) Affiliated Hospitals, we studied 122 pregnancies in African American women with preeclampsia. At University of Tennessee Health Science Center (UTHSC), we studied 93 pregnancies in African American women with preeclampsia compared to 793 control birth mothers and infants.

Results

In both studies fetal APOL1 high risk (HR) genotype was associated with preeclampsia in their mothers, relative risk at AECOM 1.65 (95% CI 1.11, 2.44) and odds ratio at UTHSC 1.92 (1.05,3.49). In both studies, maternal APOL1 HR genotypes were not associated with preeclampsia. Gestational age, birth weight and Cesarean section did not vary by APOL1 genotype. Fetal APOL1 HR genotype births with preeclampsia were no more likely to have severe preeclampsia, but those mothers were more likely to have cerebral or visual disturbances (63% versus 37%, p = 0.04) and infants had lower APGAR scores at 5 minutes (8.0 versus 9.0, p = 0.01).

Conclusion

Fetal APOL1 high-risk genotype confers an increased risk for preeclampsia, likely by adversely affecting placental function. APOL1 genetic testing may have a clinical role to predict and perhaps improve pregnancy outcomes.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support