Abstract: FR-PO494

Reported Awareness of CKD in the United States According to KDIGO Risk Groups for Prognosis

Session Information

Category: Chronic Kidney Disease (Non-Dialysis)

  • 304 CKD: Epidemiology, Outcomes - Non-Cardiovascular

Authors

  • Rodrigue, Joanne Eve, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Banerjee, Tanushree, University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Tuot, Delphine S., University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Pavkov, Meda E., Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Shahinian, Vahakn B., University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Burrows, Nilka Rios, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgia, United States
  • Saran, Rajiv, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Powe, Neil R., University of California, San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
Background

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) awareness in high risk populations is a critical public health challenge. CKD is characterized by marked differences in prevalence across race/ethnicity. Trends in awareness among those at various risks of prognosis to CKD have not been well characterized in the general United States population overall, or by race/ethnicity.

Methods

Prevalence of reported CKD awareness was assessed among non-pregnant adults aged ≥20 years in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 1999-2014 with affirmative response to the question “do you have a routine place to go for healthcare?” Participants with and without CKD were categorized into three KDIGO risk groups for prognosis to CKD of low, moderate, and high, based on eGFR and albuminuria. CKD awareness was defined by affirmative response to the question “have you ever been told that you had weak or failing kidneys?” We determined the proportions of awareness overall, by risk groups, and by race/ethnicity over time periods 1999-2004, 2005-2010, and 2011-2014. A propensity score for KDIGO risk groups was used to adjust for differences over time in demographics, hypertension, diabetes, and frequency of healthcare use.

Results

Among 23,762 adults, the adjusted proportion of reported CKD awareness across all risk groups increased from 1999-2004 to 2011-2014 (p-trend=0.04). Awareness among Mexican Americans at high risk, increased from 13.4% in 1999-2004 to 36.6% in 2011-2014, and among those at moderate risk 2.3% to 11.1% (combined p-trend=0.003). Awareness among non-Hispanic (NH) whites and NH blacks at high and moderate risk showed moderate increases over time, but the trend was not significant.

Conclusion

Overall, increases in reported awareness of CKD, particularly in Mexican-Americans at moderate and high risk of progression may be due to improvements in detection of disease or due to increases in the number of persons with CKD knowing they have the disease.

Adjusted Prevalence of Awareness by Risk Groups
Risk Groups1999-20042005-20102011-2014
Low1.1 (0.9-1.4)1.1 (0.8-1.4)1.5 (0.9-2.1)
Moderate3.1 (2.0-4.2)4.5 (2.7-6.2)5.1 (2.9-7.3)
High14.4 (7.0-21.8)9.9 (5.9-14.0)19.8 (11.6-28.0)

Funding

  • Government Support - Non-U.S.