Abstract: FR-PO443

Self-Reported Snoring Is Associated with Incident CKD Development: A Community-Based Prospective Cohort Study

Session Information

Category: Chronic Kidney Disease (Non-Dialysis)

  • 301 CKD: Risk Factors for Incidence and Progression

Authors

  • Kwon, Jaeyeol, College of Medicine, Institute of Kidney Disease Research, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Koh, Heebyung, College of Medicine, Institute of Kidney Disease Research, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Nam, Ki Heon, College of Medicine, Institute of Kidney Disease Research, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • An, Seong yeong, College of Medicine, Institute of Kidney Disease Research, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Yoo, Tae-Hyun, College of Medicine, Institute of Kidney Disease Research, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Reports have shown sleep disordered breathing symptoms including habitual snoringto be clearly associated with the development ofmetabolic derangements and vascular diseases. However, the relationship between habitual snoring and renal function is not well investigated. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the association between habitual snoring and the development of incident chronic kidney disease in a cohort of subjects with normal renal function.

Methods

Data were retrieved from the Korean Genome and Epidemiology Study, a prospective community-based cohort study. A total of 9304 subjects with normal renal function were included in the final analysis. Subjects were classified into three groups, based on self-reported snoring frequency at baseline: non-snorer, infrequent snorer, frequent snorer. The primary endpoint of study was development of CKD, defined as estimated glomerular filtration rate < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2.

Results

The mean age was 52 years. The non-snorer, infrequent snorer, frequent snorer groups each included 3573(38.4%), 3856(41.4%) and 1875(20.2%)subjects. During a mean follow-up duration of 101±53 months, 272(7.6%), 332(8.6%) and 197(10.5%) subjects developed CKD in the non-snorer, infrequent snorer and frequent snorer group. Cox Proportional Hazard model analysis revealed that snoring was an independent risk factor for incident CKD development [HR, 1.21; 95% CI,1.007-1.468; P 0.0043]. This finding was significant even after adjustments were made for confounding factors including the presence of metabolic syndrome and eGFR at baseline.

Conclusion

Snoring may increase the risk of CKD development in subjects with normal renal function. Managing sleep quality could play a role in preserving renal function.