Abstract: FR-PO109

Hyperpolarized Carbon-13 MRI to Assess AKI

Session Information

Category: Acute Kidney Injury

  • 003 AKI: Clinical and Translational

Authors

  • Aufhauser, David Dean, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Pourfathi, Mehrdad, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Murken, Douglas R., University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Wang, Zhonglin, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Ge, Guanghui, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Concors, Seth, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Hancock, Wayne W., University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Levine, Matthew H., University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, United States
Background

Assessing the severity of renal disease often requires extended periods of observation and data collection. Hyperpolarized MRI (HP-MRI) offers a novel, noninvasive tool to probe metabolic pathways regionally with exceptional signal to noise, both in research and preclinical settings. Here we demonstrate its feasibility to assess changes in renal metabolism early after ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI).

Methods

C57BL/6 mice were subjected to standardized unilateral warm renal IRI. 1 hour post-operatively, mice with placed in a 9.4T micro-imaging MRI system. Images were acquired using 30-mm H/13C dual-tuned coils. Anatomical scans were obtained using a respiratory-gate multi-slice fast spin-echo pulse sequence. Proton T2-weighted images were acquired using a multi-slice RARE sequence. [1-13C]-pyruvate was polarized using a HyperSense DNP polarizer and injected via internal jugular venous cannula. A single-slice axial 13C chemical shift image was acquired using FID-CSI sequence.

Results

Raw spectroscopic imaging data (Fig 1A) show tall peaks in each voxel indicating pyruvate signals and small peaks indicating lactate. Injured kidneys (IRI) had loss of structure on T2-weighted imaging (Fig 1B). Pyruvate intensity was higher in the control (CL) kidney (Fig 1C), and lactate-to-pyruvate ratio was elevated in the IRI kidney compared to CL (Fig 1D-E).

Conclusion

These data show that hyperpolarized [1-13C]-pyruvate MRI is a promising technique to assess rapidly regional metabolic derangements associated with kidney disease, including renal IRI.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support