Abstract: SA-PO926

Examining Patients’ Knowledge about AKI in Hospital Survivors Followed in a Dedicated AKI Clinic

Session Information

  • Educational Research
    November 04, 2017 | Location: Hall H, Morial Convention Center
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 10:00 AM

Category: Nephrology Education

  • 1301 Educational Research

Authors

  • Ortiz-Soriano, Victor M., University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Alcorn, Joseph L, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Gianella, Fabiola G, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Armentrout, MS, PA-C, Brian Scott, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Ayach, Taha, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Sawaya, B. Peter Emile, University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Malluche, Hartmut H., University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Neyra, Javier A., University of Kentucky Medical Center, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
Background

Acute kidney injury (AKI) survivors are at high risk of adverse outcomes. There are few clinics dedicated to improving the care of AKI survivors. Specialized post-discharge nephrology care may improve AKI literacy and prevent renal and non-renal complications. We examined self-rated AKI knowledge in AKI survivors followed in a specialized AKI Clinic.

Methods

This is a prospective study of 62 non-dialysis dependent AKI survivors. Patients self-rated the level of knowledge about their AKI diagnosis and the level of severity of their AKI at two time-points: pre and post their first clinic encounter. AKI was defined by KDIGO criteria. Patients’ ratings (scale: 1 lowest to 5 highest) were compared by KDIGO stages and by the occurrence of renal recovery (ratio of the first clinic encounter serum creatinine (SCr)/baseline SCr ≤1.5). Mixed-model ANOVAs were utilized.

Results

Mean (SD) age was 54 (14.7) years; 51.6% were males and 87.1% whites. Patients’ ratings of their knowledge about AKI significantly increased following the clinic encounter (p=0.001 for each KDIGO stage [Figure 1] and each renal recovery group). Patients with AKI KDIGO Stages 1 and 2 rated their AKI as less severe than patients with AKI Stage 3 (p=0.049) and Stage 3D (p=0.002). There were no differences in the level of severity of AKI ratings by renal recovery status.

Conclusion

Post-discharge specialized nephrology care increased patients’ self-assessed knowledge about their AKI diagnosis. Patients with higher KDIGO stages rated the severity of their AKI as more severe than those with lower KDIGO stages, indicating that the survey has face validity. Future studies should examine the impact of patients’ AKI literacy on patient-centered outcomes.