Abstract: FR-PO503

Daily Sedentary Time and Physical Activity Are Independently Associated with ESRD Risk

Session Information

Category: Chronic Kidney Disease (Non-Dialysis)

  • 304 CKD: Epidemiology, Outcomes - Non-Cardiovascular

Authors

  • Taylor, Jacob M., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Kabagambe, Edmond Kato, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Stewart, Thomas G., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Morse, Jennifer, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Siew, Edward D., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Blot, William J., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Lipworth, Loren, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Ikizler, Talat Alp, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
Background

Lifestyle factors, such as sedentary time and physical activity, could independently contribute to the risk of end stage renal disease (ESRD).

Methods

We assembled a case-cohort study from the Southern Community Cohort Study (SCCS) which recruited ~86,000 low-income blacks and whites in the southeastern US (2002-2009). 546 incident ESRD cases, identified by linkage with the US Renal Data System through March 2015, and a probability sample of 4049 SCCS participants, who donated a blood sample and had serum creatinine measured, were included. Demographic, medical, and lifestyle information, including detailed sedentary time and physical activity data, were obtained via questionnaire at baseline. Sedentary time was calculated as hr/d from daily sitting activities, while physical activity was calculated as met-hrs and derived from engagement in light, moderate, and vigorous activities. Hazard ratios (HRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the association of sedentary time and physical activity with ESRD were computed from multivariable Cox models that included the two variables and age, sex, race, education, income, body mass index, eGFR, smoking, history of diabetes, hypertension, and hypercholesterolemia.

Results

At baseline, the mean (SD) was 55.5 (8.8) years for age and 96 (24) mL/min/1.73m2 for eGFR. Median (25th, 75th percentile) for sedentary time and physical activity were 7.9 (5.5, 11.4) hrs/d and 15.7 (8.0, 29.1) met-hrs, respectively. Most participants were women (58%), black (67%), reached high school (65%), had low income (61%), were overweight or obese (77%), were current/former smokers (58%), and had hypertension (61%), while 25% had diabetes and 39% had hypercholesterolemia. After median follow-up of 9.7 years (range 0.08-12.8), risk of ESRD increased per IQR increase in sedentary time (HR=1.13, 95% CI 1.09-1.16), while risk decreased per IQR increase in physical activity (HR=0.93, 95% CI 0.90-0.97) in adjusted analysis.

Conclusion

In this population at high risk for ESRD, sedentary time appears to increase the risk of ESRD, whereas physical activity is inversely associated with ESRD risk. Sedentary time and physical activity appear to play independent roles in ESRD risk.

Funding

  • Other NIH Support