Abstract: TH-PO520

Supervised Exercise Intervention and Overall Physical Activity in Individuals with Moderate to Severe CKD

Session Information

Category: Chronic Kidney Disease (Non-Dialysis)

  • 305 CKD: Clinical Trials and Tubulointerstitial Disorders

Authors

  • Taylor, Jacob M., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Bian, Aihua, Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Stewart, Thomas G., Vanderbilt University, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Himmelfarb, Jonathan, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Ikizler, Talat Alp, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Alsouqi, Aseel, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Robinson-Cohen, Cassianne, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Ellis, Charles D., Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Headley, Sam A., Springfield College, Wilbraham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Tuttle, Katherine R., University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Evans, Elizabeth E., Springfield College, Wilbraham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Germain, Michael J., Renal and Transplant Assoc of New England, Hampden, Massachusetts, United States
  • Limkunakul, Chutatip, Srinakharinwirot University, Nonthaburi, Thailand
Background

Patients are often instructed to engage in multiple weekly sessions of exercise to increase physical activity; however, whether this increases overall physical activity in individuals with chronic kidney disease (CKD) remains unknown.

Methods

We performed a post-hoc analysis of a pilot randomized 4-arm trial examining the effects of diet and exercise (dietary restriction of 10%-15% reduction in caloric intake, exercise three times/week, combined diet and exercise and control)(NCT01150851). A total of 122 participants were consented, 111 were randomized, 104 started intervention and 92 completed the study. Activity was measured as counts, which are proportional to the muscular force producing motion detected by the accelerometer (ie. higher counts = more activity). For the exercise arm, counts data were only collected on non-exercise days. The primary outcome was a change from baseline in counts/minute between individuals in the exercise arms and the control group. A t-test was used to assess differences with p<0.05 being considered statistically significant.

Results

We examined all individuals who had completed at least four days wearing an accelerometer device at baseline and at the four month follow-up (n=70, n=36 in exercise arms and n=34 controls).Most participants were male (57%), white (66%), hypertensive (89%) and small portion with diabetes (29%). Mean (SD) for age was 56 (11) years, for estimated glomerular filtration rate was 43 (17) mL/min/1.73m2. Mean (SD) counts per min at baseline were 294 (257) and at month four were 288 (270). No differences were observed in change in counts/min between the exercise and control groups at month 4 (p=0.83). The results were similar in a sensitivity analysis including only those who were compliant with the exercise prescription in the exercise arm (n=11, >75% compliance at month four).

Conclusion

Our findings indicate that engaging in supervised exercise program does not necessarily increase overall physical activity in individuals with Stages 3 and 4 CKD.

Funding

  • Other NIH Support