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Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-PO957

A Modified “Teach Back” Method to Improve Self-Management in Youth with Kidney Transplants

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1702 Transplantation: Clinical and Translational

Authors

  • Chandar, Jayanthi, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Mattiazzi, Adela D., University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Bielecka, Malgorzata Natalia, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Defreitas, Marissa J., University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
  • Delamater, Alan M, University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, Miami, Florida, United States
Background

Kidney transplant recipients require adherence to a strict medical regimen. Higher rates of non-adherence are reported among adolescents, often resulting in transplant loss. Inadequate functional health literacy is one of the factors affecting adherence. Teach Back’ is a verbal literacy tool that facilitates patient understanding and knowledge retention.

Methods

We performed a quasi-experimental pilot study using a modification of the ‘Teach Back’ method, in which the patient used digital media to answer basic questions regarding their health and medication regimen while waiting to be seen by the health care provider (HCP) in clinic. The HCP then created a corrected version during the encounter and gave it to the patient. Rapid assessment of literacy-TEEN score was assessed at baseline. Knowledge of names and purpose of medications used were assessed by digital capture and by questionnaire, at baseline, upon introduction of the program with access to the patient for 1 month, and after taking away the program for one month. Knowledge was scored as 0-100% with 0 indicating no answers were correct and 100 indicating all were correct.

Results

Sixteen patients (10 male, 6 female) were recruited to the study. Mean age was 17.3± 2.4 years and 94% were ethnic minority (Black or Hispanic). Seven of 16 patients (43.75%) had an academic achievement below grade level. REALM-TEEN score was < 65% in 3/16 (18.75%) patients. At the end of the study period, there was a trend towards improvement in knowledge of medications (see figure). Only one patient used the program at home.

Conclusion

A significant proportion of adolescent transplant recipients are disadvantaged by low academic achievement. Digital technology used during clinic visits appears to be useful in improving knowledge and purpose of medications in adolescents with kidney transplants. This is an important self-management tool for transitioning adolescents to adult HCPs.

Funding

  • Private Foundation Support