Abstract: FR-PO958

Renal Safety of Cisplatin-Based Chemotherapy in Urothelial Carcinoma Patients with a Solitary Kidney

Session Information

  • Patient Safety
    November 03, 2017 | Location: Hall H, Morial Convention Center
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 10:00 AM

Category: Patient Safety

  • 1501 Patient Safety

Authors

  • Kondo, Masahiro, Nagoya City University Hospital, Nagoya, Japan
  • Hotta, Yuji, Graduate School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Nagoya City University, Nagoya, Japan
  • Ando, Ryosuke, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, Japan
  • Yasui, Takahiro, Nagoya City University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Nagoya, Japan
  • Kimura, Kazunori, Nagoya City University Hospital, Nagoya, Japan
Background

There is little information on renal safety to cisplatin-based chemotherapies in patients with a solitary kidney after nephroureterectomy. We evaluated the nephrotoxicity and hematologic toxicities of gemcitabine plus cisplatin (GC) in urothelial carcinoma patients with a solitary kidney.

Methods

We retrospectively reviewed patients treated between August 2007 and December 2016. Eligible patients received GC as first-line chemotherapy, including as neo-adjuvant and adjuvant treatment. Patients with one kidney comprised the solitary kidney (SK) group; those with both kidneys comprised the BK group. Incidences of renal insufficiency and hematologic toxicities were examined and compared between the groups.

Results

There were 18 and 43 patients in the SK and BK groups, respectively. Mean serum creatinine [SCre] levels at baseline were significantly higher in the SK group than in the BK group (P<0.001). There were no significant differences in median numbers of administered cycles and doses of GC between the groups. No significant differences were observed between the groups in the incidence of acute kidney injury (SK: 11.1%, BK: 7.0%, P=0.627). SCre levels in both groups did not significantly increase during treatment (Fig.1); mean differences in SCre levels between baseline and each post-chemotherapy cycle were similar between the groups. The incidence of hematologic toxicity (grade 3/4) was not significantly different between the groups. Multivariate analysis revealed no statistically significant association between having a solitary kidney and severe hematologic toxicities.

Conclusion

Renal safety and treatment tolerability to GC chemotherapy is not inferior in patients with a solitary kidney.

Fig.1: Change in serum creatinine levels between baseline and after each chemotherapy cycle of gemcitabine plus cisplatin in the solitary kidney (SK) and both kidneys (BK) groups.
Repeated-measures analysis of variance: NS, not significant.