Abstract: TH-PO529

Racial/Ethnic Differences in CKD and Its Risk Factors in Hawaii

Session Information

Category: Chronic Kidney Disease (Non-Dialysis)

  • 307 CKD: Health Services, Disparities, Prevention

Authors

  • Rhee, Connie, University of California Irvine, Huntington Beach, California, United States
  • Page, Victoria, National Kidney Foundation of Hawaii, Honolulu, Alabama, United States
  • Hayashida, Glen, National Kidney Foundation of Hawaii, Honolulu, Alabama, United States
  • Kataoka-Yahiro, Merle Ritsuyo, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States
  • Davis, James, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States
  • Wong, Linda L, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States
  • Gandhi, Krupa, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii, United States
  • You, Amy Seung, University of California Irvine, Huntington Beach, California, United States
  • Kalantar-Zadeh, Kamyar, University of California Irvine, Huntington Beach, California, United States
Background

While traditional risk factors for chronic kidney disease (CKD) are highly prevalent in Hawaii, there is limited data on the risk of early CKD among the racially/ethnically diverse population of this state. To address this knowledge gap, the National Kidney Foundation of Hawaii developed the Kidney Early Detection Screening (KEDS) Program to promote early CKD screening among its residents.

Methods

Among participants from the KEDS Waves 1 (2006-9) screening events, we examined the association between race/ethnicity and markers of early CKD, defined as 1) microalbuminuria (albumin-creatinine ratio ≥30mg/g) and 2) self-reported CKD using case-mix logistic regression models (adjusted for age, gender, diabetes, hypertension, body mass index, hyperlipidemia, cardiovascular disease, and smoking status).

Results

Among 1254 participants, the most predominant racial/ethnic groups were participants of Caucasian (22%), multi-race (19%), Japanese (19%), Filipino (16%), Hawaiian/Pacific Islander (8%), and Chinese (5%) background. Compared to Caucasian participants, those of native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders race/ethnicity had a higher likelihood of self-reported CKD: adjusted OR (aOR) 3.60 (1.14-11.40). Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander and Chinese participants also had a higher likelihood of microalbuminuria: aORs 2.37 (1.07-5.27) and 2.48 (1.25-4.91), respectively. Examination of CKD risk factors showed that Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders had higher risk of hypertension (aOR 1.86 [1.07-3.25]) and obesity (aOR 4.01 [2.42-6.67]).

Conclusion

These data suggest Hawaiian/Pacific Islanders have a higher risk of CKD markers compared to other racial/ethnic subgroups in the KEDS Program. Further studies are needed to determine the effectiveness of CKD interventions in this population.