Abstract: SA-PO821

Association of Hepcidin with Anemia Parameters in Incident Dialysis Patients: Difference between Dialysis Modalities

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 605 Dialysis: Anemia and Iron Metabolism

Authors

  • Lim, Jeong hoon, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Yong-Lim, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lee, Jong-Hak, Daegu Fatima Hospital, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Han, Man-hoon, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Kyu Yeun, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Jung, Hee-Yeon, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Choi, Ji-Young, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Cho, Jang-Hee, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Chan-Duck, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Park, Sun-Hee, Kyungpook National University Hospital, Daegu, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Hepcidin has been considered to be a key regulator of iron homeostasis in recent years. However, its relationships to other variables are not well understood. This study aimed to evaluate association of serum hepcidin level with iron parameters and other clinical parameters, especially according to dialysis modality, in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients.

Methods

A total of 110 incident dialysis patients, 68 on peritoneal dialysis (PD) and 42 on hemodialysis (HD), were prospectively followed up for 6 months. Serum hepcidin level was measured by a commercial ELISA kit (DRG Instruments, Marburg, Germany) at baseline and 6 months after initiation of dialysis. The relationship of hepcidin to clinical parameters was investigated using linear regression models.

Results

Serum hepcidin levels significantly increased in initial 6 month after start of dialysis. PD group showed higher hemoglobin after 6 months dialysis than HD group, in spite of less use of erythropoiesis-stimulating agents during study period. In multivariate regression model, independent predictors of serum hepcidin were aspartate transaminase (ß=21.359, p=0.003), ferritin (ß=0.056, p=0.008), transferrin saturation (ß=0.644, p=0.009), and phosphate (ß=6.946, p=0.001) in incident ESRD patients. At 6 month after initiating dialysis, serum hepcidin was independently predicted by urine volume (ß=−0.008, p=0.043), alanine transaminase (ß=12.091, p=0.008), ferritin (ß=0.051, p<0.001), and total iron binding capacity (TIBC) (ß=−0.191, p=0.002) in all patients, whereas by ferritin (ß=0.056, p<0.001) and TIBC (ß=−0.184, p=0.023) in PD patients, and urine volume (ß=−0.021, p=0.004), ferritin (ß=0.048, p=0.095), and TIBC (ß=−0.225, p=0.015) in HD patients.

Conclusion

Serum hepcidin was differentially associated with anemia parameter between PD and HD patients. Urine volume was an independent predictor of hepcidin in incident HD patients. It suggests preservation of urine volume may be important to reduce hepcidin concentration in incident HD patients.

Funding

  • Commercial Support