ASN's Mission

To create a world without kidney diseases, the ASN Alliance for Kidney Health elevates care by educating and informing, driving breakthroughs and innovation, and advocating for policies that create transformative changes in kidney medicine throughout the world.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-OR024

Association of Serum Calcification Propensity with Presence and Progression of Coronary Artery Calcification among Patients with CKD: The CRIC Study

Session Information

Category: Bone and Mineral Metabolism

  • 402 Bone and Mineral Metabolism: Clinical

Authors

  • Bundy, Joshua David, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Cai, Xuan, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Scialla, Julia J., Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Block, Geoffrey A., Colorado Kidney Care, Denver, Colorado, United States
  • Feldman, Harold I., University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Villanova, Pennsylvania, United States
  • de Boer, Ian H., Division of Nephrology and Kidney Research Institute, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Lash, James P., University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Chen, Jing, Tulane School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana, United States
  • Hsu, Chi-yuan, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California, United States
  • Dobre, Mirela A., Case Western Reserve University , Cleveland, Ohio, United States
  • Lee, Jungwha, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States
  • Rao, Panduranga S., University of Michigan Health System, Ann Arbor, Michigan, United States
  • Go, Alan S., Kaiser Permanente Northern California, Oakland, California, United States
  • Townsend, Raymond R., University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, Villanova, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Wolf, Myles, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Pasch, Andreas, University Hospital Bern, Bern, Switzerland
  • Isakova, Tamara, Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Chicago, Illinois, United States
Background

Coronary artery calcification (CAC) is prevalent among patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and predicts the risk of cardiovascular disease and mortality. We hypothesized that a novel measure of serum calcification propensity is associated with CAC among patients with CKD stages 2-4.

Methods

Among 780 participants from the CRIC Study, CAC was measured at baseline and a follow-up visit using electron beam or multidetector computed tomography. Calcification propensity was quantified at baseline as the transformation time (T50) from primary to secondary calciprotein particles, with lower T50 corresponding to higher calcification propensity. Poisson and linear regression were used to estimate associations between T50 and CAC, with a priori stratification by absence or presence of CAC at baseline.

Results

At baseline, 460 (59%) participants had any CAC and 255 (33%) participants had CAC score ≥100 Agatston units. Over an average 3-year follow-up, 65 (20%) participants without baseline CAC developed CAC while 89 participants (19%) with baseline CAC increased ≥100 Agatston units per year. After multivariable adjustment, lower T50 was associated with more severe CAC at baseline and over follow-up among those with baseline CAC (Table).

Conclusion

Among patients with CKD, higher serum calcification propensity is associated with more severe CAC and progression of CAC. Future studies should evaluate whether T50 predicts the risk of clinical cardiovascular disease and whether its determinants represent novel therapeutic targets.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support