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Kidney Week

Abstract: FR-PO1148

Impact of Chronic Illness in Children on Families: Kidney Disease (KD) versus Diabetes Mellitus (DM)

Session Information

  • Pediatric Nephrology - I
    October 26, 2018 | Location: Exhibit Hall, San Diego Convention Center
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Pediatric Nephrology

  • 1600 Pediatric Nephrology

Authors

  • Trachtman, Howard, NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
  • Malaga-Dieguez, Laura, NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
  • Vento, Suzanne M., NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
  • Pehrson, Laura Jane, NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
  • Rodgin, Sandra L., NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
  • Adkisson, Hayley Y., NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
  • Brodzinsky, Lara, NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
  • Lois, Rebecca, NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
  • Ilkowitz, Jeniece, NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
  • Gallagher, Mary P., NYU Langone Health, New York, New York, United States
Background

Chronic illness in children has adverse effects on family members besides the patient and can impact the integrity and function of the family unit. Most previous studies have examined a single disease entity. However, there has been limited assessment comparing the effect of different illnesses on family function.

Methods

Established patients treated in the pediatric ambulatory Nephrology or DM clinics were included in the study. Their parents were asked to complete the 2-page Pediatric Quality-of-Life Family Impact Module (PedsQL-FIM), version 2.0, a validated survey instrument. Clinical and laboratory data were retrieved from the electronic health record. Data were summarized as mean±SD. Disease group and child age were entered as predictors in linear regression analyses with FIM total and subscale scores as outcome variables. Comparisons between groups were assessed using paired t-tests.

Results

96 patients (43 F: 53 M) were evaluated in the Nephrology Clinic and 55 (30 F: 25 M) in the DM Clinic. The mean age of the patients was 13.0±3.9 and 10.4± 6.3 yr, respectively. Within the KD sample, older age was significantly associated with lower scores on all FIM subscale scores. Gender was not a significant predicator for FIM scores in either disease group. Controlling for age, chronic illness group was a significant predictor of the FIM total and subscale scores. Parents of D patients endorsed significantly lower total FIM scores compared to the KD patients (D 58±16; KD 79±17 p <0.001) as well as on subscales of physical, emotional, social, and cognitive functioning, communication, worry, daily activities, family relationships, and reports of health-related quality of life (P<0.01).

Conclusion

Our findings confirm that chronic illness in childhood adversely affects a wide range of aspects of family function. The impact is greater in older children with KD and varies depending on the disease context. Families with children who have DM manifested greater disturbances than those with children who have isolated KD. Further study is warranted to assess the effects of the underlying renal disease and intensity of medical care and whether there are specific features can be used to identify vulnerable families.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support