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Abstract: FR-PO690

Hyperosmolality in Peritoneal Dialysis Increases Plasma Arginine Vasopressin Levels

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 703 Dialysis: Peritoneal Dialysis

Authors

  • Ueno, Hiromichi, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan
  • Miyamoto, Tetsu, Second Department of Internal Medicine, Kitakyushu, Fukuoka, Japan
  • Sanada, Kenya, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Japan, Kitakyushu-shi, Japan
  • Fujimoto, Yoko, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan
  • Bando, Kenichiro, University of occupational and environmental health, Kitakyushu, Japan
  • Ueta, Yoichi, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan
  • Otsuji, Yutaka, University of Occupational and Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, Japan
  • Tamura, Masahito, University of Occupational & Environmental Health, Kitakyushu, FUKUOKA, Japan
Background

Fluid retention is common in peritoneal dialysis (PD) patients. Arginine vasopressin (AVP), an antidiuretic hormone, promotes fluid retention and stimulates thirst. Consequently, AVP is important for fluid management in PD patients. Although several studies have reported an increase in plasma AVP levels in hemodialysis patients, the dynamics of plasma AVP levels in PD patients has not yet been clarified.

Methods

We measured plasma AVP levels and osmolalities in 20 PD patients aged 48-79 years-old over 2-145 months of PD duration. Blood volumes were evaluated by bioelectrical impedance analysis.

Results

Plasma AVP levels (5.5 ±0.6 pg/mL) and osmolality (303.4 ±1.6 mOsm/kgH2O) increased significantly in PD patients. In addition, a positive correlation was observed between plasma AVP levels and osmolality, and a small increase in plasma glucose levels (138.5 ±11.0 mg/dl) was observed in PD patients.

Conclusion

Several studies have shown that PD solution increases plasma glucose levels. Therefore, we considered that PD-induced hyperglycemia may cause an increase plasma osmolality and AVP levels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to demonstrate an increase in plasma AVP level in PD patients. These findings provide novel insights into the fluid management of PD patients.