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Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-PO1085

Association of Social Support with CKD Among African-Americans

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 1901 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention

Authors

  • Hall, Rasheeda K., Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Davenport, Clemontina A., Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Sims, Mario, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi, United States
  • Colon-emeric, Cathleen, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Washington, Tiffany R., University of Georgia, Athens, Georgia, United States
  • St. Clair Russell, Jennifer, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Pendergast, Jane F., Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Bhavsar, Nrupen Anjan, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Scialla, Julia J., Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Tyson, Crystal C., Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Min, Nancy, University of Mississippi Medical Center, Jackson, Mississippi, United States
  • Young, Bessie A., Uniiversity of Washington, Seattle, Washington, United States
  • Boulware, L. Ebony, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
  • Diamantidis, Clarissa Jonas, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina, United States
Background

Low social support (LSS) negatively affects health behaviors. Because disease self-management and lifestyle modifications improve outcomes in chronic kidney disease (CKD), we sought to examine the independent association of LSS with CKD prevalence or rapid renal functional decline (RRFD) in African Americans at risk of CKD incidence or progression in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS).

Methods

The JHS is a prospective cohort of African Americans within the Jackson, MS metropolitan area. At baseline (2000-2004), social support was assessed using the Interpersonal Support Evaluation List (ISL); a 16-item survey with four subscales: appraisal, belonging, self-esteem, and tangible support. ISL scores < 32 indicate LSS. CKD was defined as an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) < 60ml/min/1.73m2 or a urine albumin/creatinine ratio (ACR) ≥30mg/g in those with an eGFR ≥ 60ml/min/1.73m2. We conducted multivariable logistic regression to evaluate the association between LSS and CKD prevalence in the general JHS cohort, as well as the association of LSS and RRFD (defined as a > 30% decrease in eGFR over a 10 year period) among JHS participants with diabetes, hypertension, or CKD at baseline. Models were adjusted for baseline sociodemographics, comorbidities and ACR.

Results

Of 5301 JHS participants, 4015 (76%) completed the ISL. 843 (21%) had LSS. Participants with LSS (vs. high) were more likely to have lower income (47% vs. 28%), be current or former tobacco users (39% vs. 30%), have diabetes (25% vs. 21%), and CKD (14% vs. 12%) (all p<0.05). After multivariable adjustment, LSS was not independently associated with prevalent CKD or with RRFD. However, a low self-esteem subscale score was associated with increased odds of prevalent CKD [OR 1.06 (95% CI 1.01-1.12)].

Conclusion

Overall, LSS was not independently associated with CKD outcomes among African Americans in the JHS, but low-self-esteem was associated with CKD. Self-esteem may have a role in CKD management and warrants further study.

Funding

  • Other NIH Support