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Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-PO493

Patient-Reported Outcomes (PROs) as Predictors of Healthcare Utilization (HCU) and Work Outcomes in Patients with Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD)

Session Information

  • ADPKD: Clinical Studies
    October 27, 2018 | Location: Exhibit Hall, San Diego Convention Center
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Genetic Diseases of the Kidney

  • 1001 Genetic Diseases of the Kidney: Cystic

Authors

  • Yarlas, Aaron, Optum Patient Insights, Johnston, Rhode Island, United States
  • Oberdhan, Dorothee, Otsuka, Rockville, Maryland, United States
  • Krasa, Holly, Otsuka, Rockville, Maryland, United States
  • Sikora Kessler, Asia, Optum Patient Insights, Johnston, Rhode Island, United States
  • Maher, Stephen M., Optum Patient Insights, Johnston, Rhode Island, United States
  • Bjorner, Jakob B., Optum Patient Insights, Johnston, Rhode Island, United States
Background

ADPKD is a rare progressive hereditary disease where cysts in the kidneys reduce renal function, often leading to kidney failure. ADPKD is associated with deficits in patients’ quality of life (QoL) and functioning. We examine if PROs predict HCU and work outcomes in ADPKD patients.

Methods

In a global, multi-center, longitudinal, observational study of 3,409 ADPKD patients (NCT01430494) data collection at baseline and every 6 months (up to 30 months) included measures of ADPKD-associated symptoms and health burden (ADPKD-Impact Scale [ADPKD-IS], ADPKD-Urinary Impact Scale [ADPKD-UIS]), generic QoL (SF-12v2® Health Survey [SF-12v2]), and pain (Brief Pain Inventory-Short Form [BPI-SF]) as well as HCU and work outcomes. Separate logistic regression models examined each PRO as a predictor of dichotomous HCU (0, ≥1 hospitalization) and work outcomes (0, ≥1 sick days). Ordinary least squares regression examined each PRO as a predictor of continuous work outcomes (sick days, work effectiveness). Baseline to month 18 data were used for this analysis.

Results

The likelihood of ≥1 hospitalization in the previous 6 months was significantly predicted by worse baseline scores on ADPKD-IS fatigue, emotional, and physical scales (Odds ratios [ORs] from 1.55 to 1.77), ADPKD-UIS frequency, nocturia, and urgency scales (ORs from 1.32 to 1.43), SF-12v2 physical and mental component summaries (ORs: 0.97, 0.96), and BPI-SF pain severity and pain interference scales (ORs: 1.11, 1.16), all P <.05. The likelihood of ≥1 sick day in the previous 6 months was significantly predicted by worse scores on ADPKD-IS and ADPKD-UIS scales (ORs from 1.24 to 1.76), SF-12v2 summaries (ORs: 0.95, 0.96), and BPI-SF scales (ORs: 1.25, 1.26), all P <.001. Worse scores on PROs predicted a higher number of work days missed (all P <.001), while worse scores on ADPKD-IS and ADPKD-UIS scales, SF-12v2 summaries, and the BPI-SF pain interference scale predicted lower work effectiveness (all P <.05).

Conclusion

ADPKD-associated symptoms, QoL, and pain PROs were predictive of ADPKD patients’ HCU and work outcomes. These findings support the inclusion of PROs in clinical studies and practice with ADPKD patients.

Funding

  • Commercial Support