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Abstract: TH-PO1078

Prior Military Service Associated with CKD: Analysis of the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 1901 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Epidemiology, Risk Factors, and Prevention

Authors

  • Stewart, Ian J., David Grant USAF Medical Center, Travis AFB, California, United States
  • Poltavskiy, Eduard, David Grant USAF Medical Center, Travis AFB, California, United States
  • Howard, Jeffrey T., Department of Defense Joint Trauma System, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, United States
  • Walker, Lauren, David Grant USAF Medical Center, Travis AFB, California, United States
  • Janak, Jud C., Department of Defense Joint Trauma System, Fort Sam Houston, Texas, United States
Background

While military service is associated with health promoting and compromising factors, prior work shows that veterans report poorer overall health and higher prevalence of many health compromising behaviors compared to the civilian population. Although some evidence suggests that veterans may be at higher risk for cardiovascular disease, there is a paucity of evidence regarding other medical conditions, such as chronic kidney disease (CKD). We sought to determine if CKD is more common among veterans by analyzing data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS).

Methods

We performed a cross-sectional study of BRFSS from 2011 to 2016. The presence of CKD and prior military service were determined by self-report. Standard statistics were used to compare demographic data and health behaviors between groups with and without prior military service. Weighted univariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to compare the odds of CKD development based on military status. A priori subgroup analyses stratified by race were also examined.

Results

Our search yielded a total of 2,861,628 subjects for analysis, 14.8% (n=369,844) of whom had prior military service. Individuals with prior service were more likely to have CKD (3.9% vs 2.6%; p<0.001). On univariate analysis, military service was associated with CKD development [odds ratio (OR) 1.55, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.50-1.61; p<0.001). While attenuated, this difference remained significant in the multivariable model (OR 1.12, 95% CI 1.07-1.17; p<0.001). On analysis of racial subgroups, white subjects with prior military service were more likely to report CKD compared to those without prior military service (OR 1.15, 95% CI 1.09-1.21; p<0.001) in the multivariable model. No significant difference was observed in black (OR 1.07, 95% CI 0.92-1.25; p=0.40) or Hispanic (OR 1.15, 95% CI 0.93-1.41; p=0.20) subjects.

Conclusion

While differences seem to exist across racial strata, these results from a nationally representative sample support an association between prior military service and CKD. Further research is needed to determine why veterans are at a higher risk for CKD to guide treatment and prevention efforts.

Funding

  • Other U.S. Government Support