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Abstract: TH-PO267

Relationship Between Anemia Profile and Nutritional Status as Assessed by Subjective Global Assessment in Incident Dialysis Patients

Session Information

Category: Anemia and Iron Metabolism

  • 202 Anemia and Iron Metabolism: Clinical

Authors

  • Chae, Seung Yun, Seoul St. Mary's hospital, Seoul, SEOUL, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Chung, Byung ha, Seoul St. Mary's hospital, Seoul, SEOUL, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Choi, Bumsoon, Seoul St. Mary's hospital, Seoul, SEOUL, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Park, Cheol Whee, Seoul St. Mary's hospital, Seoul, SEOUL, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Yang, Chul Woo, Seoul St. Mary's hospital, Seoul, SEOUL, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Yong-Soo, Seoul St. Mary's hospital, Seoul, SEOUL, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Ban, Tae Hyun, Seoul St. Mary's hospital, Seoul, SEOUL, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Anemia is a major complication in patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD). Subjective global assessment (SGA) is a useful tool assessing nutritional status. We investigated an association with changes of anemia, iron and erythropoietin (ESA) prescription rate, and prescribed ESA dosage after assessing nutritional status using SGA over time in incident ESRD patients.

Methods

The cohort was prospectively collected in 36 centers of the Clinical Research Center for ESRD in Republic of Korea. The incident ESRD patients started hemodialysis or peritoneal dialysis between November 2008 and Feburary 2014. We excluded patients who were younger than 18 years old, or had an underlying liver disease and malignancy. Finally, we included 898 incident ESRD patients in this study. Nutritional status was calssified to well nourished (WN, SGA A) or malnourished (MN, SGA B or C). The patients based on the change of nutritional status was divided into four groups as following: group 1, WN to WN; group 2, WN to MN; group 3, MN to WN; and group 4, MN to MN. Data between baseline and 12 months after dialysis initiation was analyzed.

Results

Serum hemoglobin and hematocrit levels, iron and ESA prescription rate, and ESA dosage were improved in all the patients at 1 year after dialysis commencement (P<0.05 for all). In subgroup analysis based on dialysis modality, serum hemoglobin and hematocrit levels of the hemodialysis patients were ameliorated in all the groups (P<0.001 for all). In addition, iron and ESA prescription rate, and ESA dosage were more definitely reduced in group 1 and 3 than the other groups (P<0.001 for both). However, these trends in the patients with peritoneal dialysis diminished or dissipated in all the groups.

Conclusion

Maintaining proper nutritional status based on SGA improved anemia in the incident dialysis patients, with reducing iron and ESA usage in especially hemodialysis patients.