ASN's Mission

ASN leads the fight to prevent, treat, and cure kidney diseases throughout the world by educating health professionals and scientists, advancing research and innovation, communicating new knowledge, and advocating for the highest quality care for patients.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-PO1058

Salt-Related Knowledge, Attitudes, and Compliance in CKD on Dialysis and Heart Failure

Session Information

Category: Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism

  • 1302 Health Maintenance, Nutrition, and Metabolism: Clinical

Authors

  • Cinelli, Michael, Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, New York, United States
  • Saouma, Samer, Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, New York, United States
  • Ghanem, Sassine, Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, New York, United States
  • Hossri, Sami U., Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, New York, United States
  • Fuca, Nicholas, Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, New York, United States
  • Zaidan, Julie, Northwell health, Staten island, New York, United States
  • Vazzana, Thomas J., Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, New York, United States
  • Lafferty, James, Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, New York, United States
  • El Sayegh, Suzanne E., Staten Island University Hospital, Staten Island, New York, United States
Background

Evidence of the adverse effect of high dietary sodium on the kidney and heart is growing. The WHO, CDC and AHA recommend consumption of <2, <2.3 and <1.5 g/day, respectively. Despite efforts, general and high-risk patient(HF and ESRD) compliance remains low. The primary aim of our study is to evaluate Na intake in HF and ESRD and correlate it with label-reading ability.

Methods

This cross-sectional study recruited patients with ESRD and HF inpatient at Staten Island University Hospital from September 2017-March 2018. A Block Sodium Screener © estimated daily Na intake and a questionnaire asked about shopping habits and label-reading proficiency with Likert scale conversion to a score(6-30). Subjects were grouped based on score, daily Na intake: <1500 mg/day or ≥1500 mg/day. Characteristics were analyzed using Student’s t-test, nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test, or χ2 test then linear regression to evaluate the relationship between Na intake and score.

Results

We recruited 61 patients: 34 ESRD, 14 HF and 13 both. We found a negative correlation between Na intake and score(R= -0.49, p<0.0001, Figure 1). There was no difference in age, BMI and gender among the 2 groups. Compliant patients had less years since diagnosis(2.70 +/-1.16 vs. 5.05 +/-5.75; p=0.0205). Other variables did not show any association with Na intake(Table 1).

Conclusion

This study showed that more knowledge about salt content and better shopping habits are associated with a lower daily Na intake in high risk populations(ESRD and HF). A larger sample is needed to evaluate for patient demographic and medical characteristics associated with non-compliance to low Na diet.

Table 1: Patient characteristics
 <1500 mg/day>= 1500 mg/dayp value
Age
BMI
Years since diagnosis
Gender
Male
Female
Ethnicity
White
Black
Hispanic
other
Diagnosis
ESRD
HF
both
Nursing home
Assistance
Education level
No schooling
8th grade
Some high school, no diploma
High school graduate
Some college credit, no degree
Trade/technical/vocational training
Associate degree
Bachelor's degree
Master's degree or higher
Marital status
Married
Single
Widowed
Separated/Divorced
In a relationship
Smoker
Drug use
Alcohol use
Atrial Fibrillation
Cancer
CHF
CAD
DM
DL
Depression
Kidney transplant
HTN
Liver cirrhosis
Other PMH
BP meds
CCB
Loop diuretics
Non-loop diuretics
Beta-blockers
ACE inhibitor
ARB
Neprilsyn inhibitor/ARB
Other
Etiology of ESRD
Diabetes
Glomerulonephritis
HTN
Obstructive
Systemic diseases
Polycystic kidney disease
Other
Unknown
Type of CHF
Ischemic
Non-ischemic
67.64 (+/-11.48)
27.36 (+/- 5.71)
2.70 (+/-1.16)

7 (20)
4 (16)

8 (19.51)
1 (9.09)
2 (33.33)
0 (0)

7 (20.59)
0 (0)
4 (30.77)
0 (0)
2 (28.57)

1 (100)
0 (0)
1 (20)
5 (22.73)
2 (11.11)
0 (0)
0 (0)
2 (25)
0 (0)

6 (19.35)
0 (0)
3 (42.86)
1 (14.29)
1 (50)
0 (0)
0 (0)
0 (0)
3 (25)
1 (12.50)
4 (17.39)
6 (24.00)
4 (13.33)
4 (17.39)
0 (0)
0 (0)
11 (23.91)
0 (0)
2 (9.09)

5 (20.83)
1 (5.26)
0 (0)
7 (19.44)
1 (11.11)
0 (0)
0 (0)
2 (15.38)

4 (22.22)
1 (25)
5 (25)
0 (0)
0 (0)
1 (100)
0 (0)
1 (25)

2 (11.11)
2 (25)
61.66 (+/-17.57)
28.10 (+/-7.66)
5.05 (+/-5.75)

35 (80)
21 (84)

33 (80.49)
10 (90.91)
4 (66.67)
3 (100)

27 (79.41)
14 (100)
9 (69.23)
2 (100)
5 (71.43)

0 (0)
1 (100)
4 (80)
17 (77.27)
16 (88.89)
1 (100)
1 (100)
6 (75)
3 (100)

25 (80.65)
14 (100)
4 (57.14)
6 (85.71)
1 (50)
7 (100)
0 (0)
3 (100)
9 (75)
7 (87.50)
19 (82.61)
19 (76.00)
26 (86.67)
19 (82.61)
1 (100)
3 (100)
35 (76.09)
0 (0)
20 (90.91)

19 (79.27)
18 (94.74)
2 (100)
29 (80.56)
8 (88.89)
6 (100)
2 (100)
11 (84.62)

17 (77.78)
3 (75)
15 (75)
0 (0)
2 (100)
0 (0)
7 (100)
3 (75)

16(88.89)
6 (75)
0.2869
0.7631
0.0205

0.7446
1




0.6271



0.0682
1
0.6017









0.6211





0.0674
0.0674
n/a
1
0.6757
1
1
0.3334
0.5077
1
1
1
0.0511
n/a
0.2988

0.7383
0.1481
1
1
1
0.5803
1
1

0.717
0.5587
0.4789
n/a
1
0.1803
0.3322
0.5587

0.4811
0.6269

Figure 1: Relationship of Na intake and label-reading score