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Abstract: TH-PO292

Gender-Specific Differences Associated with Sociocultural Attributes in Dialysis Patients: A National Cohort Analysis

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 701 Dialysis: Hemodialysis and Frequent Dialysis

Authors

  • Rosen, Sophia, Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Ferris, Maria E., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Eneanya, Nwamaka D., Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Van Zandt, Carly R., Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Preciado, Priscila, Renal Research Institute, New York, New York, United States
  • Larkin, John W., Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Usvyat, Len A., Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Maddux, Franklin W., Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Maddux, Dugan, Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
  • Reviriego-Mendoza, Marta, Fresenius Medical Care North America, Waltham, Massachusetts, United States
Background

Women and men have physiological differences that distinctly affect their health, treatment regimens, and clinical outcomes. Sociocultural factors may also play a significant role on these differences. We investigated whether certain sociocultural and certain clinical factors varied between men and women on dialysis.

Methods

All adult patients from a large dialysis provider who had a comprehensive social worker assessment and/or patient health questionnaire-2 (PHQ2) completed in 2016 were included. The association between sex, age (as of Jan 1, 2016) and sociocultural and clinical attributes noted in Table 1 was investigated. Chi-square and t-tests were used as appropriate.

Results

We included data from 209,378 patients. In both age groups, housing barriers and PHQ2 scores were greater in women, and physical component scores were higher for men. Food security was lower in younger women, but there was no difference by sex in older patients. In both age groups, married and unmarried men tended to rely on their spouse/partner while women tended to rely on a family member other than spouse/partner (Table 1).

Conclusion

Our analysis shows that among dialysis patients, several sociocultural and clinical factors differ between men and women. Further investigation is warranted to elucidate whether these factors influence sex disparities in health outcomes.

Funding

  • Commercial Support