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Abstract: FR-PO1121

The Impact of Birth Weight in Children with Biopsy Confirmed Nephrotic Syndrome

Session Information

Category: Glomerular Diseases

  • 1203 Glomerular Diseases: Clinical, Outcomes, and Trials

Authors

  • Henderson, Candace Dione, UNC Kidney Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Hu, Yichun, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Hogan, Susan L., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Poulton, Caroline J., UNC Kidney Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Sanderson, Keia, University of North Carolina Kidney Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Mendoza, Carmen E., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Kennedy, Kristin Brock, UNC Kidney Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Gibson, Keisha L., University of North Carolina Kidney Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
Background

Nephrotic syndrome is a growing cause of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in children and can lead to end-stage kidney disease (ESKD). This study evaluates the impact of low birth weight (LBW) in children with nephrotic syndrome. Additional risk factors such as gestational age and kidney size were also assessed.

Methods

This retrospective cohort study reviewed the medical records of 75 children included in the UNC Glomerular Disease Collaborative Network ages 0-18 years with biopsy proven minimal change disease (MCD), focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS), and membranous nephropathy (MN) for both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors to determine potential associations between birth history and disease and its impact on disease progression to ESKD.

Results

Thirteen (17%) were born with LBW. FSGS was more frequent in LBW children (92%) compared to normal birth weight (NBW) (55%), while NBW children were more likely to develop MCD (37%) compared to LBW children (8%). LBW children had higher body mass index (BMI) compared to NBW children. The proportion of LBW and NBW children progressing to ESKD was similar (23% vs 27% respectively).

Conclusion

Our findings suggest that LBW is associated with disease type, specifically FSGS, and higher weight. Although numbers are small, progression to eGFR≤30 appeared similar by birth weight. A larger sample size and longer follow-up is needed to further investigate the potential impact of low nephron number from LBW, especially in the setting of these glomerular diseases, and the relationship with overweight/obesity status.