ASN's Mission

To create a world without kidney diseases, the ASN Alliance for Kidney Health elevates care by educating and informing, driving breakthroughs and innovation, and advocating for policies that create transformative changes in kidney medicine throughout the world.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: FR-PO894

Urinary RANTES, IL-4, and IL-6 as Potential Prognostic Markers of Early Renal Outcome in Living Donor Kidney Transplantation

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1802 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Kim, Minjung, Samsung medical center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Boo, Hyo jin, Samsung medical center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Baeg, Song in, Samsung medical center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lee, Eun jeong, Samsung medical center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Jang, Hye Ryoun, Samsung medical center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lee, Jung eun, Samsung medical center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Dae Joong, Samsung medical center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Oh, Ha Young, Samsung medical center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Huh, Wooseong, Samsung medical center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Yoon-Goo, Samsung medical center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Changes in intrarenal immunologic micromilieu has been shown to affect the renal outcome in kidney transplantation. Recent studies have shown that some cytokines and chemokines may have potential as non-invasive diagnostic markers that detect early injury after kidney transplantation. This prospective study aimed to investigate the diagnostic value of urinary cytokines and chemokines after living donor kidney transplantation as prognostic markers of early renal outcome.

Methods

Serum and urine samples were serially collected from kidney transplant patients at the following time points; during transplantation, 8 hours, 24 hours, 72 hours, 1 week, 3 months, and 1 year after transplantation. Cytokines and chemokines including regulated on activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES), fractalkine, interleukin (IL)-10, IL-4, IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein (MCP)-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were measured in 64 patients. Patients were divided into either the good prognosis group (eGFR at post-transplant 3 months ≥ 60ml/min/1.73m2 or eGFR change ≥ -5 between post-transplant 3 and 12 months) or the poor prognosis group (eGFR at post-transplant 3 months < 60ml/min/1.73m2 or eGFR change < -5 between post-transplant 3 and 12 months). T-test and one-way or two-way ANOVA tests were used for statistical analysis.

Results

The median age of patients was 42.3 years and 70.3% were male. Urinary RANTES (P < 0.001) and urinary IL-4 (P < 0.05) at 24 hours after transplantation were higher in the good prognosis group. When patients were divided by eGFR change between 3 months and 1 year after transplantation, urinary IL-6 at 3 months after transplantation (P < 0.05) was higher in the good prognosis group. There were no differences in serum cytokines or chemokines between groups.

Conclusion

Our study showed the potential clinical value of urinary RANTES and IL-4 measured at 24 hours after transplantation as well as urinary IL-6 at 3 months after transplantation as non-invasive predictors of early renal outcome after living donor kidney transplantation.