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Abstract: FR-PO345

Circulating Extracellular miRNAs in Early Pregnancy and Preeclampsia in Women with Chronic Hypertension

Session Information

Category: Hypertension and CVD

  • 1403 Hypertension and CVD: Mechanisms

Authors

  • Malha, Line, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, United States
  • Max, Klaas Ea, Rockefeller University, New York, New York, United States
  • Muthukumar, Thangamani, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, United States
  • Yang, Hua, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, United States
  • August, Phyllis, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, United States
  • Tuschl, Thomas, Rockefeller University, New York, New York, United States
  • Suthanthiran, Manikkam, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, New York, United States
Background

Women with chronic hypertension (cHTN) are at an increased risk for developing preeclampsia (PE). Development of biomarkers that foretell PE is an unmet objective. We aim to investigate the hypothesis that circulating extracellular miRNA profiles are predictive of PE in women with cHTN.

Methods

Circulating miRNAs in 57 cell-free EDTA plasma samples collected during 9 to 19 weeks of pregnancy from women with cHTN (RO1 HL 48846. PI: P. August), were characterized by small RNA-derived barcoded cDNA sequencing. 39 samples had >1 million reads (30 samples from women who did not develop PE [No PE group] and 9 samples from women who subsequently developed PE [PE group]). We performed differential expression analysis to identify miRNAs discerning the two groups. Criteria for the selection of predictive miRNA included a base mean >5, an absolute fold change (FC) between groups >2, and an unadjusted P <0.05.

Results

Age, gestational age, race, parity, body mass index and baseline blood pressure were not different between the two groups. The PE group was more likely to have a previous history of PE (6/10 vs. 3/24, P<0.001). Differential gene expression analysis identified 19 miRNAs in agreement with the above criteria (Table 1).

Conclusion

Validation that circulating levels of 19 miRNAs in plasma may predict the development of PE in women with cHTN may inform pathogenesis and help design prophylactic strategies.

Funding

  • Other NIH Support