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Abstract: FR-PO288

Clinical Significance of Serum Sodium in Insomnia Patients

Session Information

Category: Fluid and Electrolytes

  • 902 Fluid and Electrolytes: Clinical

Authors

  • Bae, Eunjin, Gyeongsang national university hospital, Jinju, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lee, Tae won, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Changwon-si, Gyeongsangnam-do, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Jang, Ha nee, Gyeongsang national university hospital, Jinju, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Cho, Hyun Seop, Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Changwon-si, Gyeongsangnam-do, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Chang, Se-Ho, Gyeongsang national university hospital, Jinju, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Park, Dong Jun, Gyeongsang National University Changwon Hospital, Changwon, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Hyponatremia is thought to be associated with attention deficits, cognitive decline, gait disturbances, and fracture even if it is asymptomatic.
However, there is no study of hyponatremia and its clinical effects in patients with insomnia. We investigated the prevalence of hyponatremia and the clinical relevance of serum sodium concentration in patients with insomnia.

Methods

We retrospectively enrolled patients with a diagnosis of insomnia from January, 2011 to December 2012. Among these, we excluded patients who were being treated with cancer or not cured, or had renal replacement treatment. Hyponatremia was defined as a serum sodium concentration of less than 135 mmol/L. We divided into 3 groups according to serum sodium: tertile 1 (<138 mmol/L), tertile 2 (138.0-140.9 mmol/L), and tertile 3 (≥141.0 mmol/L). Multivariable logistic regression was used to evaluate the association between serum sodium level and all-cause mortality, acute kidney injury (AKI).

Results

A total of 443 patients with insomnia were included, of which 14.9% (n=67) had hyponatremia. Patients with lower serum sodium concentration tended to have lower hemoglobin, calcium, phosphorus and albumin level and older age. During median follow up 48.5 months, 19.8% (n=33), 8.4% (n=12), 2.3% (n=3) patients died in tertile 1, 2, and 3. Twenty one percent (n=35), 11.9% (n=17), 11.3% (n=15) patients experience AKI in tertile 1, 2, and 3. Tertile 1 was significantly associated with all-cause mortality (reference tertile 2 group, Hazard ratio 1.96; 95% confidence interval 0.66 – 5.80; P=0.006) even after adjusted co-variates. However, there was no significant relationship between tertile 1 and AKI.

Conclusion

In patients with insomnia, lower serum sodium is significantly associated with all-cause mortality and thus we should have continuous interest in hyponatremia, and we need to identify the cause of hyponatremia and correct the correctable factors.