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Abstract: FR-PO700

Elevated Serum Uric Acid Is Associated with Greater Skeletal Muscle Mass in Patients on Peritoneal Dialysis

Session Information

Category: Dialysis

  • 703 Dialysis: Peritoneal Dialysis

Authors

  • Xiao, Xi, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou, China
  • Yang, Xiao, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University,, Guangzhou, China
  • Yi, Chunyan, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou, China
  • Peng, Yuan, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou, China
  • Wu, Haishan, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou, China
  • Wu, Meiju, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou, China
  • Huang, Xuan, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guang Zhou, China
  • Yu, Xueqing, Department of Nephrology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, China
Background

Serum uric acid (UA) has been identified as a good nutritional marker in hemodialysis patients, but was little investigated in patients on peritoneal dialysis (PD). The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between uric acid and skeletal muscle mass (SMA) in PD patients.

Methods


This is a cross-sectional study. The patients who performed multi-frequency bioelectrical impedance (BIA) from January 1, 2013 to December 31, 2016, and with SUA values were enrolled. Collected data included demographic characteristics, clinical and laboratory measurements. Skeletal muscle mass was measured by BIA. The relationship between SUA and the skeletal muscle mass was tested by multiple linear regression models.

Results


A total of 734 prevalent PD patients (57.4%male) were enrolled, with a mean age of 48.3±14.2 years, a mean SMA of 27.0±5.5kg and a mean serum UA of 6.8±1.3mg/dl. Compared with participants in lowest quartile of UA, those participants in highest quartile showed a higher SMA(28.22±5.88 vs. 25.97±4.70, p =0.015).When examined as a continuous variable in multiple linear regression models, serum UA was positively associated with skeletal muscle mass in total patients [standardized coefficients (β) 0.453; 95% confidence interval(CI) 0.145 - 0.760, p = 0.004]. And gender-stratified analysis shows that the association exists both in male (β 0.433; 95% CI 0.010 - 0.856, p= 0.045) and female patients (β 0.486; 95% CI 0.032 to 0.940, p= 0.036). Furthermore, a significant association was found between the highest or the second highest quartiles of UA and skeletal muscle mass in fully adjusted models in PD patients(β 1.952; 95% CI 0.801 -3.102, p= 0.001; β 1.453; 95% CI 0.305-2.600, p= 0.013, respectively).

Conclusion


The elevated serum UA was associated with a greater skeletal muscle mass in PD patients, and uric acid could be a potential nutritional marker in PD patients.

Funding

  • Government Support - Non-U.S.