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Abstract: TH-PO163

A Prospective Observational Study Comparing Bone Loss in Renal Transplant and Dialysis Patients

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 1802 Transplantation: Clinical

Authors

  • Hassan, Waleed, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Yaseen, Maria, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Ashqar, Hasan, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Mohamed, Amr El-Husseini, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Lowry, Conor, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Gedaly, Roberto, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Davenport, Daniel, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Lima, Florence, University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
  • Malluche, Hartmut H., University of Kentucky, Lexington, Kentucky, United States
Background

Bone loss has been reported with chronic dialysis and after renal transplantation. This study compared the differences in longitudinal changes in BMD between dialysis and transplant patients using quantitative computed tomography (QCT).

Methods

Total hip BMD was assessed using QCT in 29 renal transplant recipients at the time of transplantation, at 6 months (n=25), and at 12 months (n=19). In addition 50 dialysis patients of similar gender, age, race, dialysis vintage, diabetes, non-smoking status, coronary artery disease, and exercise were studied. BMD at baseline and after 12 months was compared between the two groups.

Results

In transplant patients, total hip BMD by QCT decreased from a mean of 0.88 g/mm3 at time of transplantation to 0.83 g/mm3 at 6 months after transplant, then stabilized at 0.83 g/mm3 at 12 months for an average loss of 0.05 ± SE 0.02 g/mm3 (fig. 1). While the average dialysis patient lost 0.02 ± SE 0.01 g/mm3 of BMD at the hip over 12 months (p= 0.07, Figure 2). The average bone loss was higher for transplant patients with normal baseline BMD compared to patients with low BMD (Normal: -0.05 g/mm3; Low: -0.02, p=0.314).

Conclusion

Significant bone loss occurs in renal transplant recipients during the first 6 months then stabilized at 12 months. This bone loss is more than what is observed in matched dialysis patients. Normal BMD is still of concern because bone loss may be higher compared to patients with low BMD.