ASN's Mission

To create a world without kidney diseases, the ASN Alliance for Kidney Health elevates care by educating and informing, driving breakthroughs and innovation, and advocating for policies that create transformative changes in kidney medicine throughout the world.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-PO234

Endotrophin as a Marker of Complications in a Type 2 Diabetes Cohort

Session Information

Category: Diabetic Kidney Disease

  • 602 Diabetic Kidney Disease: Clinical

Authors

  • Tougaard, Ninna Hahn, Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Herlev, Capital Region, Denmark
  • Møller, Alexandra L., Nordic Bioscience, Herlev, Denmark
  • Rønn, Pernille Falberg, Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Herlev, Capital Region, Denmark
  • Hansen, Tine, Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Herlev, Capital Region, Denmark
  • Genovese, Federica, Nordic Bioscience, Herlev, Herlev , Denmark
  • Karsdal, Morten Asser, Nordic Bioscience, Herlev, Herlev , Denmark
  • Rasmussen, Daniel Guldager Kring, Nordic Bioscience, Herlev, Herlev , Denmark
  • Rossing, Peter, Steno Diabetes Center Copenhagen, Herlev, Denmark
Background

Hyperglycemia-mediated tissue injury eventually leads to fibrosis affecting various organ systems. We investigated whether endotrophin, a profibrotic signaling molecule, reflecting collagen VI formation, in serum and urine was associated with risk of developing complications in an unselected population with type 2 diabetes.

Methods

Endotrophin was measured by the PRO-C6 ELISA in serum and urine from 774 persons with type 2 diabetes recruited between 2012 and 2016. Urinary values were normalized to urine creatinine levels. Outcomes were identified through national registers and medical records and included a composite kidney endpoint (≥40% decline in kidney function or kidney failure), first major adverse cardiovascular event (MACE), all-cause mortality, progression of albuminuria, incident heart failure and sight-threatening eye disease. Cox proportional hazards models adjusted for conventional risk factors were applied.

Results

The cohort included 254 (33%) females, mean ±SD age was 65 ±12 years, diabetes duration 17 ±8.8 years, eGFR 76 ±24 ml/min/1.73m2 and median [Q1:Q3] urinary albumin excretion was 12.5 [5.5:73.5] mg/g or g/24h. Depending on outcome, median follow-up ranged from 3.0 to 6.0 years. A doubling of serum endotrophin was independently associated with the composite kidney endpoint, first MACE, all-cause mortality and incident heart failure, but not with progression of albuminuria or incident sight-threatening eye disease (Table). A doubling of urine endotrophin was independently associated with progression of albuminuria and incident heart failure, but not with the other outcomes (Table).

Conclusion

Serum endotrophin was a risk marker for mortality, kidney and cardiovascular complications in type 2 diabetes. Urine endotrophin was a risk marker for progression of albuminuria and incident heart failure.

Associations between endotrophin and complications incidence estimated by Cox proportional-hazards model