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Abstract: SA-PO910

The Effect of Randomized Beta-Carotene Supplementation on CKD in Men

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2202 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Clinical‚ Outcomes‚ and Trials

Authors

  • Chewcharat, Api, Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • Buring, Julie E., Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Sesso, Howard D., Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Rexrode, Kathryn, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Gaziano, J. Michael, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Glynn, Robert J., Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
  • Chewcharat, Pol, Harvard University T H Chan School of Public Health, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Background

Beta-carotene may protect the body against free radicals that may damage the kidney and lead to the development of acute kidney injury and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Previous studies in animal models have demonstrated a potential protective effect of 30 mg/kg beta-carotene supplementation on renal ischemia/reperfusion injury and subsequently improved kidney function. The extension of these findings to humans, however, remains unclear.

Methods

Our study leverages previously collected data from the Physicians’ Health Study I (PHS I), a large-scale, long-term, randomized trial of middle-aged and older U.S. male physicians testing 50 mg beta-carotene (BC) every other day for the primary prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer. We examined the impact of BC supplementation on incident CKD identified by self-reports stating “yes” to kidney disease from annual follow-up questionnaires and ICD-9 codes, including 585.3-585.6 from randomization in 1982 through the end of the randomized BC intervention at the end of 1995. Analyses compared incident CKD between BC supplementation and placebo using Cox proportional hazards regression models. We also examined whether smoking status (current vs former/never smoker) modified the effect of randomized beta-carotene supplementation on CKD.

Results

A total of 10,947 participants were randomized to BC, and 10,965 participants were randomized to a placebo group. Baseline characteristics between randomized BC groups were similar. There was no significant association between BC supplementation and self-reported incident CKD after adjusting for age and randomized aspirin assignment (HR = 1.11, 95% CI [0.70, 1.76], p-value = 0.66). Stratified by smoking status, there was no significant association between BC supplementation and self-reported incident CKD either among former/never smoker (HR = 0.88, 95%CI [0.53, 1.47], p-value = 0.62) or current smoker (HR = 1.81, 95% CI [0.44, 7.71], p-value = 0.41). Smoking status did not modify the association between BC supplementation and incident CKD (p-interaction = 0.37).

Conclusion

Long-term randomized BC supplementation did not affect the risk of incident CKD in middle-aged and older male physicians.