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Abstract: TH-PO021

National Survey: Point-of-Care Ultrasound Use Among Nephrology Program Directors, Fellows, and Graduates

Session Information

  • Educational Research
    November 03, 2022 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Orange County Convention Center‚ West Building
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Educational Research

  • 900 Educational Research

Authors

  • Cook, David L., Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Yuan, Christina M., Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Nee, Robert, Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
  • Patel, Samir S., Washington DC VA Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
  • Cohen, Scott D., Washington DC VA Medical Center, Washington, District of Columbia, United States
  • Little, Dustin J., Walter Reed National Military Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland, United States
Background

Nephrologists have been slow to adopt Point-of-Care Ultrasound (POCUS). We surveyed all US nephrology program directors (PDs), their fellows, and our program graduates regarding nephrology-specific POCUS training and use.

Methods

Anonymous, online survey of US nephrology PDs and their fellows (academic year 2021-2022), and 90 graduates (1986-2021) of the Walter Reed nephrology program (POCUS curriculum began 2019). We inquired about current/planned POCUS training, training type, and barriers to training and use.

Results

PD response rate (n=151) was 46%. 361 fellows were forwarded the survey link; 33% responded. Of 89 graduates, 62% responded. 51% of programs offered POCUS training, most commonly via bedside training in non-POCUS oriented rotations (71%), didactic lectures (68%), and simulation (43%). 46% of current fellows reported fellowship POCUS training; but approximately half reported not being sufficiently trained or not being confident in kidney (56%), bladder (50%), and IVC assessment (46%). Common barriers to training cited by PDs were: not enough trained faculty (78%), PDs themselves not being sufficiently trained (55%), and equipment expense (51%). 63% of PDs and 56% of fellows reported <10% of faculty were POCUS-trained. 64% of fellows reported too little training. 72% of PDs agreed that POCUS should be part of the curriculum. Among our graduates, 15% perform POCUS in clinical practice, but 50% of those with <5 years of practice experience do so. 77% of graduates agreed that POCUS should be part of the curriculum. The majority of fellows (59%) and graduates (61%) preferred hands-on POCUS training over didactic lectures or simulation.

Conclusion

The majority of fellows, PDs, and fellowship graduates surveyed agree that POCUS should be incorporated into the nephrology curriculum. The majority did not feel sufficiently trained to confidently perform POCUS, and the greatest barrier to training was lack of sufficiently trained faculty. This highlights the need to “train the trainers” before POCUS can be fully integrated into the curriculum and commonly used in nephrology practice.

Disclaimer: The views expressed in this abstract are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect the official policy the Department of Defense or the U.S. government.