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Abstract: FR-PO636

Association of Obesity With Cardiorenal Outcomes in the CureGN Cohort

Session Information

Category: Glomerular Diseases

  • 1303 Glomerular Diseases: Clinical‚ Outcomes‚ and Trials

Authors

  • Zeitler, Evan, UNC Kidney Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Hu, Yichun, UNC Kidney Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Hogan, Susan L., UNC Kidney Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Glenn, Dorey A., UNC Kidney Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Falk, Ronald, UNC Kidney Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
  • Mottl, Amy K., UNC Kidney Center, Chapel Hill, North Carolina, United States
Background

Obesity is a risk factor for cardiorenal outcomes in patients with CKD, but its relevance in glomerulonephropathy (GN) is less known.

Methods

Participants ≥16yr from CureGN were categorized by age-appropriate BMI status at enrollment: normal (20-24 in adults; 5-85 %ile in children), overweight (25-29 for adults, 85-95th %ile in children), obese (30-34 in adults, ≥95th %ile in children) or morbidly obese (≥35 in adults and children). Composite kidney (40% decline in eGFR/end-stage kidney disease) and composite cardiovascular (myocardial infarction/heart failure diagnosis/stroke/death) outcomes were evaluated. Baseline characteristics and frequency of outcomes were compared between weight status groups using Chi-square and Kruskal-Wallis tests. A log rank test was used to compare Kaplan-Meier curves of time-to-event for the kidney outcome.

Results

Characteristics and outcomes are shown in the Table. The cohort was 44% female with a median age of 44 and median (IQR) follow up of 3.74 (2.06, 5.21) years. GN diagnoses were 28% IgAN, 26% FSGS, 31% MN and 14% MCD. Higher baseline BMI was associated with higher blood pressure (p < 0.0001) and urine protein-to-creatinine ratio (uPCR, p =0.006), and lower eGFR (p=0.0002) at enrollment compared to those with a lower BMI. More kidney events occurred in the highest weight category, and the time to kidney event was shorter (Figure), but this was not true for cardiovascular events.

Conclusion

BMI is an important mediator of major kidney outcomes in GN, stressing the importance of this modifiable risk factor in its management.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support