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Abstract: FR-PO932

Long-Term Exposure to High Perceived Temperature and Risk for Mortality Among Patients With CKD

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2201 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Epidemiology‚ Risk Factors‚ and Prevention

Authors

  • Weon, Boram, Seoul National University Boramae Medical Center, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lee, Jeonghwan, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lee, Jung Pyo, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lim, Chun Soo, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

With the global warming, the interest in health risks from the high temperature exposure is growing. The Perceived Temperature (PT) is an equivalent temperature based on a complete heat budget model of the human body. We aimed to analyze the effect of PT on the overall mortality among chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients.

Methods

A total of 32,870 patients with CKD living in Seoul metropolitan region were recruited in a retrospective cohort (2001-2018). PT during summer season (from July to September, at each year) was calculated using various climate factors including air temperature nearby automated weather station, dew point temperature, wind velocity, height of anemometer above ground, and total cloud amount. We assessed the association of PT using inverse distance weighting (IDW) on mortality in CKD patients in the Cox proportional hazard model that was adjusted for sex, age, body mass index, eGFR, hypertension, and diabetes mellitus.

Results

During the 6.14±3.96 years, 3,863 deaths (13%) were observed. We confirmed the significant effects of PT (average PT: hazard ratio [HR] 1.21, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.18-1.23; minimum PT: HR 1.02, 95% CI 1.00-1.05; maximum PT: 1.20, 95% CI 1.18-1.22) on mortality in CKD patients in univariable analysis. In multivariable analysis, average PT (HR 1.22, 95% CI 1.19-1.25) and maximum PT (HR 1.20, 95% CI 1.17-1.23) showed increased risk for overall mortality among CKD patients.

Conclusion

Long-term exposure to high PT during summer season increased the risk of mortality among CKD patients.