ASN's Mission

To create a world without kidney diseases, the ASN Alliance for Kidney Health elevates care by educating and informing, driving breakthroughs and innovation, and advocating for policies that create transformative changes in kidney medicine throughout the world.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-PO807

Outcomes of Commercial Renal Transplantation: A Single Center Experience

Session Information

Category: Transplantation

  • 2002 Transplantation: Clinical

Author

  • El Agroudy, Amgad E., Arabian Gulf University, Manama, Bahrain
Background

While the ethical aspects of transplant tourism have received much attention recently, less has been written about the medical safety of this practice. We retrospectively evaluated the outcomes of patients who purchased organs internationally and presented to our center for follow-up care.

Methods

We report the outcome parameters of 270 local recipients of unrelated kidney (URT) vendor transplants presenting to our institute between 1986 and 2014. Their outcome was compared with 123 recipients of living-related donor transplants matched for age, gender and transplant duration done in our center as controls (RT).

Results

Age of unrelated recipients was 42.6 ± 13.4 years with Male % of 68. The country of transplant was mainly in Philippines (n = 85), Pakistan (n = 56), India (n = 57), Iran (n = 40) and Egypt (n= 25). Comparison of commercial recipients with controls showed high co morbidities (P = 0.01) with hepatitis-C (n=2 vs. 0) and hepatitis-B (n=2 vs. 0) and cytomegalovirus (n=4 vs. 1). Donor age was 25.9 ± 3.8 vs. 34.6 ± 8.6 years (P = 0.0001) and 90.4% were male. Biologic agents induction in 74 (27.4%) vs. 123 (100%) (P = 0.00001), acute rejections in 65 (24.1%) vs. 26 (21.1%) (P = 0.7), while recurrent rejection in 13 (4.8%) vs. 1 (0.8%) (P = 0.04), surgical complications including lymphocele 16 (5.9%) vs. 0 (0%) (P = 0.0001), ureteral obstruction 7 (2.6%) vs. 0 (0%) (P = 0.007), hematoma 4 (1.5%) vs. 1 (1.1%) (P = 0.06) and recurrent urinary tract infection 18 (9.9%) vs. 6 (6.8%) (P = 0.3). Overall 1- and 10-year for graft survival was 91% and 22% vs. 98% and 44% and for patient survival 96% and 70% vs. 98% and 78% in URT and RT, respectively (P = 0.001)

Conclusion

Although recent developments increased success in renal transplantation, receiving a kidney from a paid living donor at a commercial transplant center still carries great risks for the recipient.