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Abstract: TH-PO745

Menstruation and Contraception in Females With CKD: A Global Mixed-Methods Study

Session Information

Category: Women's Health and Kidney Diseases

  • 2100 Women's Health and Kidney Diseases

Authors

  • Chang, Danica H., University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Dumanski, Sandi M., University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Brennand, Erin Alexandra, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Ruzycki, Shannon M., University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Ramage, Kaylee, University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
  • Gantar, Taryn, University of Alberta, Edmonton, Alberta, Canada
  • Ahmed, Sofia B., University of Calgary, Calgary, Alberta, Canada
Background

Chronic kidney disease (CKD) in reproductive-aged females is accompanied by menstrual disorders and low contraceptive use. However, most data are limited to the dialysis and transplant populations and in-depth experiences describing this within the scope of CKD have not been studied. Therefore, this mixed-methods study aimed to describe self-assessed menstruation and contraceptive use among females across all stages of CKD.

Methods

People aged 18-50 years, with a uterus, and diagnosed with CKD were invited to participate in an online survey followed by an optional telephone interview. The survey was disseminated globally through 112 kidney organizations, patient groups, and social media.

Results

Of 152 respondents, 98 satisfied the inclusion criteria [n=20 dialysis (age 35±1 years), n=59 non-dialysis (age 32±1 years), n=19 transplant (age 35±2 years)], representing 3 continents and predominantly self-identifying as white cisgender women. The most common causes of CKD were congenital anomalies of the kidney and urinary tract (30%), acute kidney injury and glomerulonephritis (15% each), and IgA nephropathy (21%) among the dialysis, non-dialysis, and transplant groups, respectively. One participant each in the dialysis and non-dialysis groups experienced primary amenorrhea, though more reported secondary amenorrhea (25% dialysis, 15% non-dialysis, 26% transplant). Of participants with current menses, 86%, 94%, and 100% of the dialysis, non-dialysis, and transplant groups reported heavy menstrual bleeding; however, only 50%, 69%, and 43% were always able to afford period products. Regarding, contraception, 50%, 63%, and 37% of dialysis, non-dialysis, and transplant participants reported no use, though among users, male condoms were notably popular in the dialysis (33%) and non-dialysis (48%) groups. Further, the interviews revealed a need for greater multidisciplinary care in the management of reproductive health in the context of CKD.

Conclusion

Abnormal menstruation and period poverty are common, and contraception use is low among females with CKD, highlighting an important gap in the sex-specific care of this population.

Funding

  • Government Support – Non-U.S.