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Abstract: SA-PO010

Addressing Barriers to Peritoneal Dialysis: Can It Look Pretty?

Session Information

  • Bioengineering
    November 05, 2022 | Location: Exhibit Hall, Orange County Convention Center‚ West Building
    Abstract Time: 10:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Category: Bioengineering

  • 300 Bioengineering

Authors

  • Ayub, Fatima, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, United States
  • Whale, Larissa N., University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States
  • Kapales, Makenzie, University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States
  • Sanchez Gracias, Jose A., University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States
  • Stephens, Tayte A., University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States
  • Schaefer, Christopher, University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States
  • Tegel, Andrew, University of Arkansas Fayetteville, Fayetteville, Arkansas, United States
  • Singh, Manisha, University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock, Arkansas, United States
Background

Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an effective renal replacement strategy for patients with end-stage renal disease that utilizes the abdominal peritoneum to filter toxins. PD offers a patient survival comparable to in-center hemodialysis while preserving residual kidney function and empowering patient autonomy. The usual PD catheters have a 16 cm tubing set protruding from the patient’s abdomen which can have negative implications on their self-image. This set is in part the PD catheter, and in part a transfer set. For the ease of design, we first worked on the transfer set. We present an improved retractable transfer set to address one of the barriers to PD. We believe that this designed set is the first of its kind.

Methods

Our project started with a patient-centered survey of PD patients assessing the need for a modified PD tubing set. Most patients wanted to try a smaller catheter set. We studied multiple designs including spiral, retractable and collapsible bulbs. We used Solidworks to design one of the desired tubes and created negative molds for casting and prototyping by 3D printers. Liquid silicone was used to form the 3D shape of a transfer set. We were able to create 3 prototypes. The first prototype utilized Ultimaker as the 3D printer for the mold using PLA filament with PVA supports. For the second, we used the FormLabs resin printer with photopolymer resin. Lastly, for the third prototype, we utilized an elastic photopolymer resin with the formlabs printer to create the model of a transfer set.

Results

The final design for our PD transfer set has a bendy straw section that is 7cm when extended and much smaller when collapsed, sandwiched between two connector portions, one fits into the transfer set clamp and the other connects the transfer set to other parts of the catheter. It wasn’t until the catheter was printed on the Formlab’s Resin printer without a mold that a successful prototype was created. Flow simulations were also conducted and it was determined that the new design kept the desired flow rate of 0.2 L/min.

Conclusion

A PD catheter with a retractable transfer set was modeled and verified as a viable option for a new PD catheter product. Our ultimate goal is to design the catheter portion of the set retractable as well. A shorter set will decrease the negative self-image of our patients.

Funding

  • Private Foundation Support