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Abstract: TH-PO065

Risk of Ventricular Tachycardia and Its Outcomes in Patients Undergoing Continuous Renal Replacement Therapy due to AKI

Session Information

Category: Acute Kidney Injury

  • 102 AKI: Clinical‚ Outcomes‚ and Trials

Authors

  • Kim, Seong Geun, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Yun, Donghwan, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Lee, Jinwoo, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kang, Min woo, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Dong Ki, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Oh, Kook-Hwan, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Joo, Kwon Wook, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Yon Su, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Han, Seung Seok, Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Despite the best efforts to treat critically ill patients requiring continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) due to acute kidney injury, their mortality risk remains high. This worse condition may be attributable to complications of CRRT, such as arrhythmias. Here, we addressed the occurrence of ventricular tachycardia (VT) and its relationship with patient outcomes after starting CRRT due to acute kidney injury

Methods

A total of 2,397 patients who started CRRT due to severe acute kidney injury were retrospectively enrolled from 2010 to 2020 at Seoul National University Hospital, Korea. The occurrence of VT was evaluated from starting to weaning from CRRT. The odds ratios (ORs) of mortality outcomes were measured using logistic regression models after adjustment for multiple variables.

Results

VT occurred in 150 (6.3%) patients after starting CRRT. Among them, 95 cases were defined as sustained VT (i.e., lasting ≥ 30 sec), and the other 55 cases were defined as nonsustained VT (i.e., lasting < 30 sec). The occurrence of sustained VT was associated with a higher mortality rate than nonoccurrence (OR, 1.99 [1.17–3.37] for 7-day mortality; OR, 2.04 [1.23–3.39] for 30-day mortality; and OR, 4.06 [2.04–8.08] for 90-day mortality). The mortality rates did not differ between patients with nonsustained VT and nonoccurrence. The use of ≥ 3 vasopressors and certain trends of blood laboratory findings such as acidosis and hyperkalemia were associated with the subsequent risk of sustained VT for patients on CRRT.

Conclusion

Sustained VT occurrence after starting CRRT is associated with patient mortality. The monitoring of electrolytes and acid-base status during CRRT is essential because of its relationship with the risk of VT.