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Abstract: TH-PO779

Prevalence, Overlap, and Prognostic Impact of Multiple Frailty Domains in Older Patients on Hemodialysis

Session Information

Category: Geriatric Nephrology

  • 1200 Geriatric Nephrology

Authors

  • Imamura, Keigo, Kitasato University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Sagamihara, Japan
  • Yamamoto, Shohei, Center for Clinical Sciences, National Center for Global Health and Medicine, Shinjuku, Japan
  • Suzuki, Yuta, National Institute of Public Health, Wako, Japan
  • Yoshikoshi, Shun, Kitasato University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Sagamihara, Japan
  • Uchida, Juri, Kitasato University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Sagamihara, Japan
  • Nakajima, Takuya, Kitasato University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Sagamihara, Japan
  • Fukuzaki, Narumi, Kitasato University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Sagamihara, Japan
  • Harada, Manae, Sagami Circulatory Organ Clinic, Sagamihara, Japan
  • Matsunaga, Atsuhiko, Kitasato University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Sagamihara, Japan
Background

Frailty is a state of increased vulnerability due to adverse health outcomes and is recognized as a multidimensional construct comprising physical, psychological, and social domains. There is limited evidence, however, on the association between multiple domains of frailty and risks of adverse events in patients undergoing hemodialysis (HD). Here we report the prevalence, degree of overlap, and prognostic impact of multiple frailty domains in older patients with HD.

Methods

Outpatients (aged ≥60 years) who underwent HD between 2017 and 2020 were retrospectively enrolled. Outcomes were all-cause mortality and hospitalization. We used the Cox proportional hazard model for examine the associations.

Results

Among 344 older patients (mean age, 72 years; 61% were male), the prevalence of physical, psychological, and social domains of frailty was 56.7%, 26.7%, and 57.3%, respectively. In addition, 15.4% of patients had overlap in all three domains. In the Cox model, the greater number of frailty domains was associated with higher risks of all-cause mortality (P for trend=0.001, Figure 1) and hospitalization (P for trend<0.001, Figure 2).

Conclusion

Older patients with HD had overlapping frailty domains, which were associated with poor prognosis. These results suggest that multidimensional assessment of frailty is important for disease management in patients requiring HD.

Funding

  • Government Support – Non-U.S.