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Abstract: TH-PO241

Nesfatin-1 and Tubulointerstitial Damage in Diabetic Kidney Disease: A Possible Biomarker for the Histological Severity

Session Information

Category: Diabetic Kidney Disease

  • 602 Diabetic Kidney Disease: Clinical

Authors

  • Miyake, Sayoko, Kinki Daigaku Byoin, Osakasayama, Osaka, Japan
  • Nakatani, Yoshihisa, Kinki Daigaku Byoin, Osakasayama, Osaka, Japan
  • Nakano, Yukihito, Kinki Daigaku Byoin, Osakasayama, Osaka, Japan
  • Arima, Shuji, Kinki Daigaku Byoin, Osakasayama, Osaka, Japan
Background

Although adipokines are known to contribute to the pathogenesis of diabetic kidney disease (DKD), pathological significance of nesfatin-1, an adipokine in DKD remains unclear. We studied the possible associations between serum nesfatin-1 concentrations and histological renal damages in 56 persons with biopsy-proved DKD.

Methods

The relation between serum nesfatin-1 concentrations, clinical parameters and renal histological damage were cross-sectionally investigated. The relation between serum nesfatin-1 concentrations and renal outcomes were also examined longitudinally.

Results

Serum nesfatin-1 concentrations showed a significant negative correlation with age, total cholesterol, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, but not with other clinical parameters. Persons were divided into the following three groups based on serum nesfatin-1 concentrations (pg/mL): low- (log average: 1.99), normal- (log average: 3.05), and high-group (log average: 3.60). Histological analysis of tubulointerstitial lesions showed higher interstitial fibrosis and tubular atrophy scores and more severe interstitial infiltration in the group with low serum nesfatin-1 concentrations than in the other groups. However, there was no significant relation between serum nesfatin-1 concentrations and the severity of glomerular lesions nor renal outcomes.

Conclusion

Serum nesfatin-1 concentrations showed a strong correlation with diabetic tubulointerstitial damage level, suggesting its clinical utility as a biomarker for histological injury in DKD.