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Abstract: TH-PO873

Association Between Dietary Magnesium Intake and Incident CKD

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2201 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Epidemiology‚ Risk Factors‚ and Prevention

Authors

  • Koh, Hee Byung, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Heo, Ga Young, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kim, Hyo Jeong, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Ko, Ye Eun, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Kang, Shin-Wook, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
  • Park, Jung Tak, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul, Korea (the Republic of)
Background

Recent studies suggest a close association between low serum magnesium levels and kidney injury. However, whether dietary magnesium intake relates with kidney function is not well known. In this study, the relationship of dietary magnesium intake with the development of chronic kidney disease (CKD) was evaluated.

Methods

This observational study screened 210,984 European adults aged 40-70 who underwent dietary questionnaires from April 2009 to June 2012 in the UK Biobank cohort. Participants with underlying CKD (baseline eGFR < 60 mL/min/1.73 m2 or urine albumin-to-creatinine ratio >30mg/g/Cr) or dietary energy intake <500 kcal or >6000 kcal were excluded. Dietary magnesium intake was assessed through online 24-hour recall dietary questionnaire and adjusted for energy intake using residual method. The participants were categorized into quartiles according to energy-adjusted dietary magnesium intake. Primary outcome was incident CKD diagnosed through ICD-10 and OPCS-4 codes. Sensitivity analysis was performed with outcome of CKD defined as eGFR <60 mL/min/1.73 m2.

Results

A total of 144,408 participants were included in the final analysis. The mean age was 55.8 ± 8.0 years and 51.8 % were female. Average magnesium intake amount per person was 352.0 ± 118.7 mg/day. During a 1431716.4 person-year follow-up, CKD outcome occurred in 4,438 patients. Incidence of CKD was progressively lower in patients with higher magnesium intake (3.5%, 3.1%, 2.9%, and 2.7% in Q1-4, respectively). Cox regression analysis revealed that the hazard ratios (HRs) for incident CKD decreased in a stepwise manner towards higher magnesium intake quartiles (1Q: HR, 0.90; 95% CI, 0.83-0.97; 2Q: HR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.77-0.90; 3Q: HR, 0.80; 95% CI, 0.74-0.87) relative to 4Q (P for trend <0.001). This association was maintained even after adjustments were made for confounding factors. Similar results were observed with eGFR-defined CKD outcome (1Q: adjusted HR [AHR], 0.93; 95% CI, 0.84-1.04; 2Q: AHR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.76-0.96; 3Q: AHR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.74-0.94) relative to 4Q (P for trend =0.002).

Conclusion

Higher intake of dietary magnesium may relate with lower risk of kidney function decline in adults with normal kidney function.