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Abstract: FR-PO678

Collapsing Glomerulopathy and Systemic Lupus Erythematosus: Case Series

Session Information

Category: Glomerular Diseases

  • 1303 Glomerular Diseases: Clinical‚ Outcomes‚ and Trials

Authors

  • Strufaldi, Fernando Louzada, Universidade de Sao Paulo Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Luvizotto, Mateus Justi, Universidade de Sao Paulo Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Segura, Gabriela C., Universidade de Sao Paulo Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Woronik, Viktoria, Universidade de Sao Paulo Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Dias, Cristiane B., Universidade de Sao Paulo Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Cavalcante, Livia Barreira, Universidade de Sao Paulo Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Yu, Luis, Universidade de Sao Paulo Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
  • Jorge, Lectícia, Universidade de Sao Paulo Hospital das Clinicas, Sao Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil
Introduction

Collapsing glomerulopathy is a clinical entity characterized by massive proteinuria, elevated serum creatinine, and rapid progression to end-stage renal disease. It is associated with autoimmune diseases, viral infections, and medications. Here we report 5 cases, which had the association between collapsing glomerulopathy (CG) and systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE).

Case Description

Clinical features of the patients are summarized in Table 1. At the beginning of the clinical presentation, 4 patients had nephrotic syndrome, with creatinine values ranging from 0.9 up to 3.37 mg/dL, without complement consumption. Regarding clinical manifestation of SLE, all patients had arthritis as the main symptom. Histological findings showed that the patients had focal to moderate focal fibrosis and tubular atrophy. One also had diabetic nephropathy. Another male patient, whose renal outcome was worse, had class IV lupus nephritis. The mean follow-up time of patients was 138 months, with 2 patients achieving complete remission, 1 patient partial remission, and 1 patient reached the combined endpoint of doubling creatinine and progression to end-stage renal disease. Of the 5 patients, one still does not have sufficient follow-up

Discussion

The pathogenesis of cases of CG associated with SLE remains unclear. Humoral and/or cellular immunity factors seem to be involved in the development of the disease. Due to the relative rarity of prevalence, there is currently no treatment based on clinical evidence