ASN's Mission

To create a world without kidney diseases, the ASN Alliance for Kidney Health elevates care by educating and informing, driving breakthroughs and innovation, and advocating for policies that create transformative changes in kidney medicine throughout the world.

learn more

Contact ASN

1401 H St, NW, Ste 900, Washington, DC 20005

email@asn-online.org

202-640-4660

The Latest on Twitter

Kidney Week

Abstract: TH-PO769

Albuminuria in Older Adults: Data on Prevalence and Trends Over 8 Years in the Berlin Initiative Study (BIS)

Session Information

Category: Geriatric Nephrology

  • 1200 Geriatric Nephrology

Authors

  • Bothe, Tim, Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Schaeffner, Elke, Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Mielke, Nina, Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Schneider, Alice, Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Barghouth, Muhammad, Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • van der Giet, Markus, Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Kuhlmann, Martin K., Vivantes Klinikum im Friedrichshain, Berlin, Berlin, Germany
  • Ebert, Natalie, Charite Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Berlin, Germany
Background

Data on the course of albumin-creatinine ratio (ACR) in the elderly are scarce. Identifying patterns of ACR progression is important for a better understanding of albuminuria in old age.

Methods

We used data of the BIS, a community-dwelling cohort of 2,069 persons aged 70 or older. Baseline visit was conducted between 2010 and 2011, followed by four biennial follow-up visits. Prevalence of albuminuria (no: ACR<30 mg/g; micro: ACR 30–299 mg/g; macro: ACR≥300 mg/g) was assessed from spot urine at all study visits. In a sub-analysis, we included only non-deceased participants with complete attendance and valid ACR measures at all study visits.

Results

At baseline, mean age was 80.4 years (range: 70–100) and 52.6% were females. Median ACR increased from 10.7 at baseline to 13.3 mg/g after 8 years. Prevalence of micro- and macroalbuminuria remained nearly stable over time (21.6–25.3% and 3.3–4.1%, respectively). In the subgroup with complete attendance, median ACR raised from 7.3 to 13.2 mg/g, whereas prevalence of micro- and macroalbuminuria increased from 14.9 to 25.6% and 1.7 to 3.3% after 8 years, respectively.

Conclusion

We found that over the observation period of 8 years, ACR increased longitudinally in the subgroup with complete attendance only slightly by about 6 mg/g and prevalence of microalbuminuria by 11%. Cross-sectionally, ACR increased in the total population by only 3 mg/g and prevalence of micro-and macroalbuminuria remained nearly stable over 8 years at approximately 25% and 4%, respectively. The coefficient of variation for ACR measurement is known to be relatively high, therefore values should be considered as rough estimates only.