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Abstract: SA-PO166

Association Between Probiotic Consumption and Kidney Stone

Session Information

Category: Bone and Mineral Metabolism

  • 402 Bone and Mineral Metabolism: Clinical

Authors

  • Chewcharat, Api, Mount Auburn Hospital, Cambridge, Massachusetts, United States
  • Nigwekar, Sagar U., Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, United States
Background

Gut microbiota plays a pivotal role in calcium oxalate kidney stone formation. Probiotic preparations, especially those with Lactobacillus and Bifidobacterium, may help degrade oxalate and reduce the risk of kidney stones. However, data is still controversial.

Methods

We conducted a cross-sectional study among 6,354 US adults aged 20-80 years old in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from cycles 2015-2016 and 2017-2018. Probiotic consumption was defined as self-reported yogurt consumption from 24-hour dietary recall or probiotic supplement based upon dietary supplement use 30-day questionnaire. Our outcomes were a history of kidney stones and symptomatic kidney stones in the past year. We examined the association between yogurt consumption and probiotic supplementation and history of kidney stones and symptomatic kidney stones in the past year using weighted multivariable logistic regression.

Results

Of 6,354 US adults, 1,274 (20.1%) participants reported probiotic consumption. There were 710 (11.2%) participants who reported a history of kidney stones and 107 (1.7%) participants with symptomatic kidney stones in the past year. The prevalence of kidney stones was 10.2% among those who reported probiotic consumption vs. 11.4% among those without probiotic consumption (p-value = 0.21). The prevalence of symptomatic kidney stones in the past year was 2.1% among those who reported probiotic consumption vs. 1.6% among those without probiotic consumption (p-value = 0.18). After adjusting for confounders, there were no associations between probiotic consumption and history of kidney stones (OR = 0.98, 95%CI [0.71, 1.34], p-value = 0.88) and symptomatic kidney stones in the past year (OR = 1.34, 95%CI [0.65, 2.78], p-value = 0.42) (Table 1).

Conclusion

Probiotic consumption is not associated with either history of kidney stones or a risk of symptomatic kidney stones in the past year.