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Abstract: SA-PO943

Patient Perceptions of a CKD Population Health Management Program to Improve Kidney Care

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2202 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Clinical‚ Outcomes‚ and Trials

Authors

  • Devaraj, Susan M., University of Pittsburgh Department of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Hamm, Megan E., University of Pittsburgh Department of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Kenkre, Balchandre N., University of Pittsburgh Department of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Cameron, Flor, University of Pittsburgh Department of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
  • Abdel-Kader, Khaled, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, United States
  • Jhamb, Manisha, University of Pittsburgh Department of Medicine, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States
Background

The majority of chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients are managed by primary care providers (PCPs), and novel approaches are needed to improve care and outcomes in these patients. We sought to ascertain patient perceptions of a population health management (PHM) approach to improving CKD care in high-risk patients managed by their PCP.

Methods

Patients with high-risk CKD who were receiving PHM intervention in an ongoing randomized control trial involving remote co-management of CKD by a nephrologist, pharmacist led medication reconciliation, and CKD education who had at least one CKD education session were recruited from May 2021-Feb 2022 for this study. Using purposive sampling, patients from three pre-defined strata (racial/ethnic minorities, low socio-economic status, multi-morbidities) were enrolled until thematic saturation was reached. A one-time 30-min phone interview was conducted, and data was analyzed using MAXQDA software.

Results

In this preliminary analysis of 30 of 45 patient interviews (mean age 74 years, 47% females, 17% racial/ethnic minorities, 47% low SES, 43% high comorbidity burden), several themes have emerged. First, patients expressed support for a collaborative relationship between their PCP and the nephrologist for co-management of CKD. Secondly, patients expressed poor understanding of the cause or health risks associated with CKD. In fact, some did not even recall receiving education although they had all met with the nurse educator. Thirdly, patients reported receiving diet/fluid education tips and had interest in implementing them, with many reporting a greater understanding of how diet/fluid recommendations related to their kidney health and could be implemented in the context of their personal habits. Finally, most patients affirmed they would recommend the education sessions to other CKD patients.

Conclusion

CKD patients who are managed by their PCP have high acceptance of remote co-management by a nephrologist. Patients perceive some aspects of CKD health education to be beneficial, however more effective approaches to communicating risk for CKD development and progression may be needed.

Funding

  • NIDDK Support