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Kidney Week

Abstract: SA-PO894

Effects of Colchicine on Renal Fibrosis Marker in Patients With CKD

Session Information

Category: CKD (Non-Dialysis)

  • 2202 CKD (Non-Dialysis): Clinical‚ Outcomes‚ and Trials

Authors

  • Wuttiputhanun, Thunyatorn, Chulalongkorn University Faculty of Medicine, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Phannajit, Jeerath, Chulalongkorn University Faculty of Medicine, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Susantitaphong, Paweena, Chulalongkorn University Faculty of Medicine, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Eiam-Ong, Somchai, Chulalongkorn University Faculty of Medicine, Bangkok, Thailand
  • Katavetin, Pisut, Chulalongkorn University Faculty of Medicine, Bangkok, Thailand
Background

Renal fibrosis and chronic inflammation are key contributors to CKD. Colchicine which has both anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory properties might be an attractive drug to retard CKD progression.

Methods

In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, we randomly assigned patients with CKD stage 3 and 4 to receive either colchicine 0.6 mg on alternate day or placebo in 1:1 ratio. The primary outcome was the change in urine transforming growth factor beta-1 (TGF-β1) from baseline to 12 weeks. Secondary outcomes were changes in urine monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), kidney function, chronic inflammatory indicators and safety outcomes.

Results

A total of 40 patients underwent randomization. The change in urine TGF-β1 from baseline to 12 weeks did not differ among the two groups. The colchicine group showed significantly lower values of WBC counts, neutrophil counts, neutrophil-to-lymphocyte ratio and platelet count compared with the placebo group. On the contrary, the change in urine MCP-1 in colchicine group was significantly higher than placebo group. No significant differences of the change of kidney function and C-reactive protein were found. Adverse events between groups were comparable.

Conclusion

Colchicine failed to show improvement of renal function indicators and renal fibrosis marker. Effects on inflammation was inconclusive. Colchicine decreased systemic neutrophil-related inflammation in patients with CKD stage 3 and 4 but increased urine MCP-1. Further investigation of the role of colchicine in slowing CKD progression is required.

Primary and secondary efficacy outcome