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Abstract: TH-PO363

Patients With Autosomal Dominant Polycystic Kidney Disease (ADPKD) Without a Clear Family History Have Rapid Progression and Poor Prognosis

Session Information

Category: Genetic Diseases of the Kidneys

  • 1101 Genetic Diseases of the Kidneys: Cystic

Authors

  • Gkika, Vasiliki, Department of Nephrology, General Hospital of Athens “G. Gennimatas”, Athens, Greece
  • Louka, Michaela, Department of Nephrology, General Hospital of Athens “G. Gennimatas”, Athens, Greece
  • Tigka, Eirini, Department of Nephrology, General Hospital of Athens “G. Gennimatas”, Athens, Greece
  • Drakopoulos, Angelos, Department of Nephrology, General Hospital of Athens “G. Gennimatas”, Athens, Greece
  • Kostopoulou, Myrto, Department of Nephrology, General Hospital of Athens “G. Gennimatas”, Athens, Greece
  • Tsirpanlis, George I., Department of Nephrology, General Hospital of Athens “G. Gennimatas”, Athens, Greece
Background

A small percentage of patients with ADPKD have no clear family history. The clinical course and prognosis of the disease in this subgroup of patients may be different. The present study investigates the progression and prognostication of End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) in a large cohort of patients with and without a family history of ADPKD.

Methods

This study enrolled 291 patients who were being followed in a specialized outpatient ADPKD clinic. Patients having a total of more than 10 kidney cysts in a recent Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scan were included in the study even if they had no clear family history or confirmatory genetic test. At enrollment, Total Kidney Volume (TKV) was calculated by MRI and the Mayo Clinic Imagining Category (MCIC) was determined. The prediction of ESRD based on the Mayo Clinic formula (which takes into consideration age, TKV, e-GFR, gender, race, and MCIC) was also calculated. Demographics, medical, and laboratory data were recorded using a standardized form. T-test, x2 and Mann-Whitney test were used for statistical analysis.

Results

Of the 291 patients included in the study, 34 (12%) had no clear family history of ADPKD and 257 (88%) had a clear family history. Age, gender, presence or not, and age at diagnosis of hypertension as well as BMI were similar in the two groups . The age at diagnosis of ADPKD was similar between patients with and without a clear family history as well as, the e-GFR, the stage of Chronic Kidney Disease and albuminuria. The TKV tended to be higher in patients without a clear family history than in those with a family history of ADPKD (2210 ml vs. 1650 ml, p=0.09) and the same was valid for the height-adjusted TKV (p=0.08). In MCIC 1C, 1D, and 1E, more patients without a known family history of ADPKD were classified than patients with a family history of ADPKD (89% vs 70%), and vice versa in MCIC 1A and 1B (11% vs 30%) (p=0.04). Finally, the ESRD prediction was 16 years for the patients without a clear family history and 34 years for those with a clear family history of ADPKD (p=0.025).

Conclusion

Patients with ADPKD without a clear family history tend to have a more rapid progression and a worse renal prognosis than those with a clear family history of ADPKD.